London, United Kingdom
Frank Stella’s “Black Series II" lithographs, Tate Collection.

London, United Kingdom

Frank Stella’s “Black Series II" lithographs, Tate Collection.


London, UK
Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.
The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia Kent, Paul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.

London, UK

Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.

The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia KentPaul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.


Krefeld, Germany

Joseph Beuys wants to kill your to do list.

Works from the Tate Collection, London.


London, United Kingdom

Now warming our lobby wall in Ace Hotel London Shoreditch, the meticulous artist craftsmen at Dovecot Studios have custom-woven us a stately tapestry — its eight distinct panels fashioned from an array of materials, including wool, cotton, linen, camel, and mohair.

Founded in Edinburgh in 1912, Dovecot built its reputation as a leading contemporary fine art tapestry studio — collaborating over the years on works with Cecil Beaton, Peter Blake, Graham Sutherland, Peter Saville, David Hockney, and Frank Stella.

True to Dovecot’s century-old philosophy, the large-scale commission began as a hands-on dialog between Ace and Master Weaver Naomi Robertson — a series of conversations that lead us to a unique gestation process. Initially taking cues from the principles of Bauhaus and the textile work of Anni Albers, we set out to honor the art and aesthetics inherent in the weaving process — incorporating a number of specialized, experimental and traditional weaving techniques to celebrate these inner-workings as the objet d’art in and of itself.

The project also served as a christening of sorts for Dovecot’s new loom, with both it and their tried-and-true apparatus working in tandem with each other to develop our pieces. Along the way, action weaver Travis Meinolf added his own bits alongside: fabric off-cuts, hotel documents and even locks of hair. 

Unusually, the suite was installed to reveal what is normally hidden — the reverse of the weavings — giving a unique insight into what lies behind the process. 

Details from a photograph by Andrew Meredith.


London, UK
Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London. Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.


London, UK
Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.

London, UK

Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.


London, UK
Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014. 
We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.
The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  
How and why did you start the blog? 
'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.
Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?
Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 
Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 
The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 
Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.

London, UK

Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014.

We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.

The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  

How and why did you start the blog? 

'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.

Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?

Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 

Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 

The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 

Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


London, United Kingdom, Room 427
London artist Rob Lowe’s deft electrical tape mural, improvised on the spot using a secret set of rules he’s developed over the years.
We met Rob (aka Supermundane) via Kemistry Gallery, right down the street from us in Shoreditch. Their upcoming Exhibition of Type and Textuality opens February 3.

London, United Kingdom, Room 427

London artist Rob Lowe’s deft electrical tape mural, improvised on the spot using a secret set of rules he’s developed over the years.

We met Rob (aka Supermundane) via Kemistry Gallery, right down the street from us in Shoreditch. Their upcoming Exhibition of Type and Textuality opens February 3.


London, United Kingdom
"In 1950 out of sheer necessity, my husband Mr. Harold Morris and myself went into business as Industrial Clothing Specialists. 
Gloverall of London were the first clothiers to make the traditional Military and Naval Duffle coats available to civilians … In the 1950-60’s the Gloverall Duffle became a sartorial Symbol of Social Renegades. Angry young men, art students, and Beatniks favoured the Duffle coat.” — Excerpt from the Gloverall Story.
We had the honor of collaborating with the eternal English clothier for our Ace x Gloverall Duffle Coat — an update on a true British classic. It’s a thing of beauty, and you can find it here. 

London, United Kingdom

"In 1950 out of sheer necessity, my husband Mr. Harold Morris and myself went into business as Industrial Clothing Specialists. 

Gloverall of London were the first clothiers to make the traditional Military and Naval Duffle coats available to civilians … In the 1950-60’s the Gloverall Duffle became a sartorial Symbol of Social Renegades. Angry young men, art students, and Beatniks favoured the Duffle coat.” — Excerpt from the Gloverall Story.

We had the honor of collaborating with the eternal English clothier for our Ace x Gloverall Duffle Coat — an update on a true British classic. It’s a thing of beauty, and you can find it here


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