New York City

Man Forever is Kid Millions is John Colpitts — a founding member of Oneida, touring member of Spiritualized and one of the most omnipresent percussive forces in NYC. Under the Man Forever handle, Kid crafts intricate walls of pure percussion — long, rhythmic explorations that swell and pulse in a well-crafted cacophony. 

Man Forever’s new record Ryonen — recorded with contemporary classical ensemble So Percussion — drops today on Thrill Jockey, and he’s passed along this video to give us a brief glimpse into some of his more, well, challenging explorations. We’ll be celebrating the new record every Tuesday this month, with Man Forever-related friends and family spinning records in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York.

Our friends at Ad Hoc stopped by a couple weeks ago, sitting down to discuss the new record with Kid Millions and So Percussion — you can take a look at the interview over at their site

Man Forever dominates the eastern half of these United States from now through the end of June.


New York City, 1966

Frank O’Hara, “Having a Coke with You.” 


New York City
There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless. —Simone de Beauvoir.
Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.

New York City

There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless.
—Simone de Beauvoir.

Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.


image

New York City

During a brief break between the snow and cold of this brutal NY winter, Brooklyn based painter Rostarr braved a scant, sketchy scissor lift to adorn the recently installed scaffolding around Ace Hotel New York. 

My name is Romon Yang also know as Rostarr, I am a painter & calligrapher and I live and work in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. I was born in South Korea and moved with my family to Washington D.C. in 1972, I arrived in New York City in 1989 to attend the School of Visual Arts and have called NY home ever since.

Standing outside the whole day watching you paint the mural was pretty great. People crowded around and asked a lot of questions about you, who you are, where you’re from, but the number one question was, “is it some ancient Arabic script?” Tell us about the forms, your inspirations, how this style came about.

My approach to calligraphy is abstract & gestural, similar to asemic writing, and often times iconographic and pictogram like. As a young boy up until art school where I studied Typography and Iconography design, I’ve always appreciated the beauty and forms of calligraphy from China, Korea, Tibet, Thailand and Arabic calligraphic masters, and similarly my appreciation of hand styles by graffiti writers such as Phase II, Rammellzee, Futura, Keith Haring, etc., it was a natural transition for me to go from abstract painting to abstract calligraphy and vice versa. I will forever be a student of the brush & pen.    

image

Everyone was amazed at how quickly you worked, you did half of the scaffolding in one day. You don’t appear to make mistakes either, it’s crazy. You’re clearly a pro at this, how long have you been doing this kind of work, these kinds of murals? 

Yeah, it’s a bit crazy to think that I painted a 4 foot high x 350 foot wide mural in 2 days (to be exact 10 hours, but who’s counting). I’ve been very fortunate to have been invited to make murals and large installations of various types, indoors/outdoors since 1998, around the time I joined the NY art collective Barnstormers. Making public art is giving love, plain and simple.

What inspires you, excites you, puts you your totally chill and creative zone?

I find the most pleasure in the moment of painting where I get in the zone and start laying my lines and shapes down, almost like building a visual sculpture. I get inspired by visualizing a location or wall and its surroundings and try to solve the problem with what style will make the right impact. 

With this painting commission for Ace Hotel, speed was an important factor as I wanted this mural to convey the energy and flow of commuters passing by 29th street & Broadway, similar to the way a computer motherboard looks with routes, destinations and intersections.

image

Seems like one of the benefits to being a successful artist such as yourself, is that you get to do some traveling. Where’s you’re favorite place you’ve travelled to and what made it special?

I feel so lucky to have travelled a lot for my art, some of my favorite places have been: Tokyo, Paris, London, Venice, L.A., Mexico, Puerto Rico and especially Seoul Korea. Being that I left Korea when I was just 1 years old, Seoul holds a special place in my heart and is a place that I’m so curious about getting to know better, in a short amount of time I’ve met so many talented individuals and good friends out there, Seoul is definitely the place to watch out for!

As with any scaffolding in NYC, Rostarr’s work could be up for 3 months or 2 years. We recommend checking it out soon if you don’t want to miss it: 29th & B’way.

Photos by Lauren Coleman. 


New York City

Chris Tucci — illustrator, animator, universal charmer and hero behind our long standing Sunday Night Live music series in the lobby of Ace Hotel New York — recently finished this bewildering animation for Streets of Laredo. We can’t decide which part we like the most.


New York City

Last week wrapped up the final chapter in 24BY36, an ongoing experiment in art creation within the walls of Ace New York. For the project, 36 solo and duo artists spent the night with the purpose of producing 24 original works by morning. Love letters, collages, manifestos, musical partitions — we’ve been greatly amazed by the fruit of those twenty-four nights. The following snapshots are just an early glimpse into the collection of work and we’re already feeling inspired for the next edition.

image

NOWORK

image

FCKNLZ

image

ARIEL DILL

image

PATRICK HIGGINS

image

ADAM DUGAS + CASEY SPOONER


New York City
The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.
Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.

New York City

The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.

Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.


New York City
To ready the latest show in the Gallery — Park & Parcel: Watercolors by Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder —we worked with master-framer Yaqub Esmaelsadeh, aka Jacob, the proprietor of Decor Art Gallery. 
Born in Kabul, he finished high school in 1979 — precisely three days after the Soviet war began — and promptly left to study medicine in West Germany. Once he graduated from Medical School in Hamburg in 1998, he first visited — and instantaneously fell in love with New York.
After moving to the United States, Esmaelsadah began framing as a part-time job while attending ESL classes in New Paltz. In framing, he found both a career path and an opportunity to express himself creatively. In 1991, he opened the Decor Art Gallery at 337 Park Ave South. He considers himself a pioneer in offering affordable, high quality wood frames.
How has the neighborhood changed since 1991?
I’m one of the few left small businesses in this area. This neighborhood had bad reputation at times but now, it’s one of the most beautiful places in New York. Sometimes I go to Madison Square Park to relax and enjoy the atmosphere.
What are some of the more memorable things you’ve framed?
Rifles, Berlin Wall pieces, or a ketubah using the pieces of broken glass from the ceremony…
At a museum, do you ever look at the frames before the art?
Oh yes, not just in museums. Wherever I go, my first attention is on the frames. That’s one of the biggest changes on me, and my house looks like a museum.
Did you ever frame Roger Rabbit?
A few years back, Disney cels were big in the market and we were framing almost every one of those characters…and also Roger Rabbit.
We teamed up with Mad. Sq. Arts to present Park and Parcels. The opening reception is tomorrow at 5pm in the Gallery at Ace Hotel New York.

New York City

To ready the latest show in the Gallery — Park & Parcel: Watercolors by Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder —we worked with master-framer Yaqub Esmaelsadeh, aka Jacob, the proprietor of Decor Art Gallery.

Born in Kabul, he finished high school in 1979 — precisely three days after the Soviet war began — and promptly left to study medicine in West Germany. Once he graduated from Medical School in Hamburg in 1998, he first visited — and instantaneously fell in love with New York.

After moving to the United States, Esmaelsadah began framing as a part-time job while attending ESL classes in New Paltz. In framing, he found both a career path and an opportunity to express himself creatively. In 1991, he opened the Decor Art Gallery at 337 Park Ave South. He considers himself a pioneer in offering affordable, high quality wood frames.

How has the neighborhood changed since 1991?

I’m one of the few left small businesses in this area. This neighborhood had bad reputation at times but now, it’s one of the most beautiful places in New York. Sometimes I go to Madison Square Park to relax and enjoy the atmosphere.

What are some of the more memorable things you’ve framed?

Rifles, Berlin Wall pieces, or a ketubah using the pieces of broken glass from the ceremony…

At a museum, do you ever look at the frames before the art?

Oh yes, not just in museums. Wherever I go, my first attention is on the frames. That’s one of the biggest changes on me, and my house looks like a museum.

Did you ever frame Roger Rabbit?

A few years back, Disney cels were big in the market and we were framing almost every one of those characters…and also Roger Rabbit.

We teamed up with Mad. Sq. Arts to present Park and Parcels. The opening reception is tomorrow at 5pm in the Gallery at Ace Hotel New York.


New York City, New York
Tonight, duo Mint&Serf will be presenting their latest work at the Bleecker Street Arts Club in New York City.
Respectively born in Moscow and Brooklyn, Mint and Serf (a.k.a. The Mirf) are Mikhail Sokovikov and Jason Aaron Wall.  After meeting in the late 1990’s, the duo made the city and the streets of New York not only their canvas but also their muse, taking graffiti to another level by playing with layers, materials and movements. 
The continuous wilderness and the conflicted experience of what life on the streets can be has been a constant inspiration to the duo, whom we are prideful to count among our collaborators – the duo curated some of the in-room art for Ace Hotel New York back in 2009. 
Support, Therapy and Instability, a showcase of their most up-to-date paintings, will be ongoing until February 22.

New York City, New York

Tonight, duo Mint&Serf will be presenting their latest work at the Bleecker Street Arts Club in New York City.

Respectively born in Moscow and Brooklyn, Mint and Serf (a.k.a. The Mirf) are Mikhail Sokovikov and Jason Aaron Wall.  After meeting in the late 1990’s, the duo made the city and the streets of New York not only their canvas but also their muse, taking graffiti to another level by playing with layers, materials and movements. 

The continuous wilderness and the conflicted experience of what life on the streets can be has been a constant inspiration to the duo, whom we are prideful to count among our collaborators – the duo curated some of the in-room art for Ace Hotel New York back in 2009. 

Support, Therapy and Instability, a showcase of their most up-to-date paintings, will be ongoing until February 22.


Midtown, New York City

24 BY 36 is 36 artists producing 24 works overnight at Ace Hotel.
12 solo artists and 12 collaborative duos hotel-camping in New York.

We’ve invited a handful of artists to storm the castle, prompted with poems, scores, instructions, drawings, and scraps. We provide the room, the bottle of wine and the foundation-year-style Art Bin full of charcoal sticks and kneaded erasers. And then we get out of their way.

It kicked off last week with a collaborative effort by Sto and his invited accomplice Asha Man. The two laid down a tarp, made an altar, installed tons of small works around said altar, got nude, body-painted, evoked some spirits and in the end, made us a drawing. 

Tonight we’re posting up with JD Samson


Powered by Tumblr