San Francisco, London and everywhere.  
After some years of gay-ins early in ’70s Golden Gate Park, on this day in 1978, San Francisco Pride pushed through Market as Gay Freedom Day. That day was the coming out of the Gilbert Baker-designed Rainbow Flag that has become a banner for the rights of everyone. 
Tomorrow in Shoreditch at Ace Hotel we’re rainbow flagging it up with JD Samson and our collaborative Pride party Everyone. Everyone’s invited. We’ve got a Pride playlist to blast on the ‘phones as you get ready for tonight. It’s the second part of our series of Pride celebrations with JD at Ace outposts in LA, London, New York, and Palm Springs. (And number three Pride is this weekend in New York City.)
You can dance, you can sing, you can make a team of hi-fivers and hi-five everyone you see if you want. You can be free and be together with free people. As part of the party, JD created a hand-screened shirt and a poster that you can pick up to pack pride anywhere you wear clothes or have walls. And proceeds go to help good people, too. 

San Francisco, London and everywhere.  

After some years of gay-ins early in ’70s Golden Gate Park, on this day in 1978, San Francisco Pride pushed through Market as Gay Freedom Day. That day was the coming out of the Gilbert Baker-designed Rainbow Flag that has become a banner for the rights of everyone. 

Tomorrow in Shoreditch at Ace Hotel we’re rainbow flagging it up with JD Samson and our collaborative Pride party Everyone. Everyone’s invited. We’ve got a Pride playlist to blast on the ‘phones as you get ready for tonight. It’s the second part of our series of Pride celebrations with JD at Ace outposts in LA, London, New York, and Palm Springs. (And number three Pride is this weekend in New York City.)

You can dance, you can sing, you can make a team of hi-fivers and hi-five everyone you see if you want. You can be free and be together with free people. As part of the party, JD created a hand-screened shirt and a poster that you can pick up to pack pride anywhere you wear clothes or have walls. And proceeds go to help good people, too. 


New York City
We live and love in a world where about everybody works. If you’re a coder or an office person — someone who sits down to work — it’s easy to notice your body’s got a positive feedback loop habit. Since we have a lobby where programmers and creative people sit and make things night and day, we wanted to do something that would help the hardworking workers of the world keep healthy habits as they designed, made deals, wrote and all the rest of it. Since ideas are better when done with partners, since partnerships of purpose produce a greater more holistic whole, we asked The Clinton Foundation if they would be willing to lend some brains and brawn to our seedling. After meeting and planning and working together to reimagine our lobby community, our ideas grew. The conversation gained momentum.  
So. Last year we hosted a three day code-down at Ace New York — the first in a series of coding-a-thons we call, simply enough, Codeathon. The Clinton Foundation’s Health Matters Initiative, Atelier Ace, Tumblr and Jawbone partnered to challenge developers and designers: dig in to the zeros and ones to create a health-based application prototype to help people work more healthfully. When you’re living healthy, you’re thinking healthy. Ultimately this makes everyone happier and produces amazing work, proving you don’t have to go on a sugar-and-caffeine-and-pizza bender to get things done. We said to coders and designers and programmers: you work so hard to make the world better — take care of yourselves while you do it. Let’s work together to create a culture of makers whose healthy lives and applications lead by example. Stretch, drink some tea, get in the sun and feel the warmth of life surround you.
We’ve done Codeathon a few times since then, and have been consistently blown away by what can happen when you put the right partners together, get the right group of brain waves working to make a difference. We want to spread this seed. Recently, LE Miami Awards saw and liked what we achieved by working together. And tonight they might like it a lot. It’s a testament to what can happen when like-minded groups dig in, form partnerships of purpose and set out to change the world.
UPDATE: teamwork makes the dream work. 




Photos courtesy of Clinton Foundation 

New York City

We live and love in a world where about everybody works. If you’re a coder or an office person — someone who sits down to work — it’s easy to notice your body’s got a positive feedback loop habit. Since we have a lobby where programmers and creative people sit and make things night and day, we wanted to do something that would help the hardworking workers of the world keep healthy habits as they designed, made deals, wrote and all the rest of it. Since ideas are better when done with partners, since partnerships of purpose produce a greater more holistic whole, we asked The Clinton Foundation if they would be willing to lend some brains and brawn to our seedling. After meeting and planning and working together to reimagine our lobby community, our ideas grew. The conversation gained momentum.  

So. Last year we hosted a three day code-down at Ace New York — the first in a series of coding-a-thons we call, simply enough, Codeathon. The Clinton Foundation’s Health Matters Initiative, Atelier Ace, Tumblr and Jawbone partnered to challenge developers and designers: dig in to the zeros and ones to create a health-based application prototype to help people work more healthfully. When you’re living healthy, you’re thinking healthy. Ultimately this makes everyone happier and produces amazing work, proving you don’t have to go on a sugar-and-caffeine-and-pizza bender to get things done. We said to coders and designers and programmers: you work so hard to make the world better — take care of yourselves while you do it. Let’s work together to create a culture of makers whose healthy lives and applications lead by example. Stretch, drink some tea, get in the sun and feel the warmth of life surround you.

We’ve done Codeathon a few times since then, and have been consistently blown away by what can happen when you put the right partners together, get the right group of brain waves working to make a difference. We want to spread this seed. Recently, LE Miami Awards saw and liked what we achieved by working together. And tonight they might like it a lot. It’s a testament to what can happen when like-minded groups dig in, form partnerships of purpose and set out to change the world.

UPDATE: teamwork makes the dream work

Photos courtesy of Clinton Foundation 


New York City

John Fahey made his guitar sound open as the American West, and with his hands he massaged an aural optimism from wood and metal that had seen the darkness, but decided to remain in light, as they say.

Tonight at Ace Outpost NYC Steve Lowenthal will be launching his biography Dance of Death: The Life of John Fahey. David Fricke is going to say a little something. Music. All of it.  


New York City

The great artist is their own greatest creation, they say. If you’ve dipped down below the street in New York City where the cell phone don’t shine, and if you got to where you wanted to get, you’ve been influenced by his work designing New York’s simple and eye-catching subway map. Massimo Vignelli was generous, driven, and worked to make life more beautiful for himself and for the people in this world.

Mr. Vignelli understood that beauty is a way of seeing things in the world. Proportion, balance, space — the movement of the eye — these things are free, simple and clean. You can learn to see them by slowing down, paying attention, savoring the details. His work helped make our world more beautiful, and a world filled with beauty is a place we all want to care for, participate in, where there’s somehow more time to see and do together.  

Massimo Vignelli made things. But more importantly, he brought us closer to one another. Today we’re writing all our thank yous and goodbyes to him in Helvetica.  


Los Angeles / London / New York / Palm Springs
Pride is coming. And everyone is invited. This year we’re tickled all colors of the rainbow that JD Samson is teaming with us to pop the pride parties for our locals in LA / LDN / NYC / PSP. JD’s been a pardner to Ace here for a hot minute, and it’s with worlds of pleasure that we work together again. The cherry on top: JD went out and made a special mixtape for our aural delight. Participate. Be active. Let’s be out and let’s do this. #everyonespride

Los Angeles / London / New York / Palm Springs

Pride is coming. And everyone is invited. This year we’re tickled all colors of the rainbow that JD Samson is teaming with us to pop the pride parties for our locals in LA / LDN / NYC / PSP. JD’s been a pardner to Ace here for a hot minute, and it’s with worlds of pleasure that we work together again. The cherry on top: JD went out and made a special mixtape for our aural delight. Participate. Be active. Let’s be out and let’s do this. #everyonespride


New York City
"People pay to see others believe in themselves."
We’re glad you were born into this world, Kim Gordon.

New York City

"People pay to see others believe in themselves."

We’re glad you were born into this world, Kim Gordon.


New York City

Man Forever is Kid Millions is John Colpitts — a founding member of Oneida, touring member of Spiritualized and one of the most omnipresent percussive forces in NYC. Under the Man Forever handle, Kid crafts intricate walls of pure percussion — long, rhythmic explorations that swell and pulse in a well-crafted cacophony. 

Man Forever’s new record Ryonen — recorded with contemporary classical ensemble So Percussion — drops today on Thrill Jockey, and he’s passed along this video to give us a brief glimpse into some of his more, well, challenging explorations. We’ll be celebrating the new record every Tuesday this month, with Man Forever-related friends and family spinning records in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York.

Our friends at Ad Hoc stopped by a couple weeks ago, sitting down to discuss the new record with Kid Millions and So Percussion — you can take a look at the interview over at their site

Man Forever dominates the eastern half of these United States from now through the end of June.


New York City, 1966

Frank O’Hara, “Having a Coke with You.” 


New York City
There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless. —Simone de Beauvoir.
Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.

New York City

There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless.
—Simone de Beauvoir.

Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.


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New York City

During a brief break between the snow and cold of this brutal NY winter, Brooklyn based painter Rostarr braved a scant, sketchy scissor lift to adorn the recently installed scaffolding around Ace Hotel New York. 

My name is Romon Yang also know as Rostarr, I am a painter & calligrapher and I live and work in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. I was born in South Korea and moved with my family to Washington D.C. in 1972, I arrived in New York City in 1989 to attend the School of Visual Arts and have called NY home ever since.

Standing outside the whole day watching you paint the mural was pretty great. People crowded around and asked a lot of questions about you, who you are, where you’re from, but the number one question was, “is it some ancient Arabic script?” Tell us about the forms, your inspirations, how this style came about.

My approach to calligraphy is abstract & gestural, similar to asemic writing, and often times iconographic and pictogram like. As a young boy up until art school where I studied Typography and Iconography design, I’ve always appreciated the beauty and forms of calligraphy from China, Korea, Tibet, Thailand and Arabic calligraphic masters, and similarly my appreciation of hand styles by graffiti writers such as Phase II, Rammellzee, Futura, Keith Haring, etc., it was a natural transition for me to go from abstract painting to abstract calligraphy and vice versa. I will forever be a student of the brush & pen.    

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Everyone was amazed at how quickly you worked, you did half of the scaffolding in one day. You don’t appear to make mistakes either, it’s crazy. You’re clearly a pro at this, how long have you been doing this kind of work, these kinds of murals? 

Yeah, it’s a bit crazy to think that I painted a 4 foot high x 350 foot wide mural in 2 days (to be exact 10 hours, but who’s counting). I’ve been very fortunate to have been invited to make murals and large installations of various types, indoors/outdoors since 1998, around the time I joined the NY art collective Barnstormers. Making public art is giving love, plain and simple.

What inspires you, excites you, puts you your totally chill and creative zone?

I find the most pleasure in the moment of painting where I get in the zone and start laying my lines and shapes down, almost like building a visual sculpture. I get inspired by visualizing a location or wall and its surroundings and try to solve the problem with what style will make the right impact. 

With this painting commission for Ace Hotel, speed was an important factor as I wanted this mural to convey the energy and flow of commuters passing by 29th street & Broadway, similar to the way a computer motherboard looks with routes, destinations and intersections.

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Seems like one of the benefits to being a successful artist such as yourself, is that you get to do some traveling. Where’s you’re favorite place you’ve travelled to and what made it special?

I feel so lucky to have travelled a lot for my art, some of my favorite places have been: Tokyo, Paris, London, Venice, L.A., Mexico, Puerto Rico and especially Seoul Korea. Being that I left Korea when I was just 1 years old, Seoul holds a special place in my heart and is a place that I’m so curious about getting to know better, in a short amount of time I’ve met so many talented individuals and good friends out there, Seoul is definitely the place to watch out for!

As with any scaffolding in NYC, Rostarr’s work could be up for 3 months or 2 years. We recommend checking it out soon if you don’t want to miss it: 29th & B’way.

Photos by Lauren Coleman. 


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