New York City

Chris Tucci — illustrator, animator, universal charmer and hero behind our long standing Sunday Night Live music series in the lobby of Ace Hotel New York — recently finished this bewildering animation for Streets of Laredo. We can’t decide which part we like the most.


New York City

Last week wrapped up the final chapter in 24BY36, an ongoing experiment in art creation within the walls of Ace New York. For the project, 36 solo and duo artists spent the night with the purpose of producing 24 original works by morning. Love letters, collages, manifestos, musical partitions — we’ve been greatly amazed by the fruit of those twenty-four nights. The following snapshots are just an early glimpse into the collection of work and we’re already feeling inspired for the next edition.

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NOWORK

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FCKNLZ

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ARIEL DILL

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PATRICK HIGGINS

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ADAM DUGAS + CASEY SPOONER


New York City
The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.
Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.

New York City

The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.

Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.


New York City
To ready the latest show in the Gallery — Park & Parcel: Watercolors by Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder —we worked with master-framer Yaqub Esmaelsadeh, aka Jacob, the proprietor of Decor Art Gallery. 
Born in Kabul, he finished high school in 1979 — precisely three days after the Soviet war began — and promptly left to study medicine in West Germany. Once he graduated from Medical School in Hamburg in 1998, he first visited — and instantaneously fell in love with New York.
After moving to the United States, Esmaelsadah began framing as a part-time job while attending ESL classes in New Paltz. In framing, he found both a career path and an opportunity to express himself creatively. In 1991, he opened the Decor Art Gallery at 337 Park Ave South. He considers himself a pioneer in offering affordable, high quality wood frames.
How has the neighborhood changed since 1991?
I’m one of the few left small businesses in this area. This neighborhood had bad reputation at times but now, it’s one of the most beautiful places in New York. Sometimes I go to Madison Square Park to relax and enjoy the atmosphere.
What are some of the more memorable things you’ve framed?
Rifles, Berlin Wall pieces, or a ketubah using the pieces of broken glass from the ceremony…
At a museum, do you ever look at the frames before the art?
Oh yes, not just in museums. Wherever I go, my first attention is on the frames. That’s one of the biggest changes on me, and my house looks like a museum.
Did you ever frame Roger Rabbit?
A few years back, Disney cels were big in the market and we were framing almost every one of those characters…and also Roger Rabbit.
We teamed up with Mad. Sq. Arts to present Park and Parcels. The opening reception is tomorrow at 5pm in the Gallery at Ace Hotel New York.

New York City

To ready the latest show in the Gallery — Park & Parcel: Watercolors by Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder —we worked with master-framer Yaqub Esmaelsadeh, aka Jacob, the proprietor of Decor Art Gallery.

Born in Kabul, he finished high school in 1979 — precisely three days after the Soviet war began — and promptly left to study medicine in West Germany. Once he graduated from Medical School in Hamburg in 1998, he first visited — and instantaneously fell in love with New York.

After moving to the United States, Esmaelsadah began framing as a part-time job while attending ESL classes in New Paltz. In framing, he found both a career path and an opportunity to express himself creatively. In 1991, he opened the Decor Art Gallery at 337 Park Ave South. He considers himself a pioneer in offering affordable, high quality wood frames.

How has the neighborhood changed since 1991?

I’m one of the few left small businesses in this area. This neighborhood had bad reputation at times but now, it’s one of the most beautiful places in New York. Sometimes I go to Madison Square Park to relax and enjoy the atmosphere.

What are some of the more memorable things you’ve framed?

Rifles, Berlin Wall pieces, or a ketubah using the pieces of broken glass from the ceremony…

At a museum, do you ever look at the frames before the art?

Oh yes, not just in museums. Wherever I go, my first attention is on the frames. That’s one of the biggest changes on me, and my house looks like a museum.

Did you ever frame Roger Rabbit?

A few years back, Disney cels were big in the market and we were framing almost every one of those characters…and also Roger Rabbit.

We teamed up with Mad. Sq. Arts to present Park and Parcels. The opening reception is tomorrow at 5pm in the Gallery at Ace Hotel New York.


New York City, New York
Tonight, duo Mint&Serf will be presenting their latest work at the Bleecker Street Arts Club in New York City.
Respectively born in Moscow and Brooklyn, Mint and Serf (a.k.a. The Mirf) are Mikhail Sokovikov and Jason Aaron Wall.  After meeting in the late 1990’s, the duo made the city and the streets of New York not only their canvas but also their muse, taking graffiti to another level by playing with layers, materials and movements. 
The continuous wilderness and the conflicted experience of what life on the streets can be has been a constant inspiration to the duo, whom we are prideful to count among our collaborators – the duo curated some of the in-room art for Ace Hotel New York back in 2009. 
Support, Therapy and Instability, a showcase of their most up-to-date paintings, will be ongoing until February 22.

New York City, New York

Tonight, duo Mint&Serf will be presenting their latest work at the Bleecker Street Arts Club in New York City.

Respectively born in Moscow and Brooklyn, Mint and Serf (a.k.a. The Mirf) are Mikhail Sokovikov and Jason Aaron Wall.  After meeting in the late 1990’s, the duo made the city and the streets of New York not only their canvas but also their muse, taking graffiti to another level by playing with layers, materials and movements. 

The continuous wilderness and the conflicted experience of what life on the streets can be has been a constant inspiration to the duo, whom we are prideful to count among our collaborators – the duo curated some of the in-room art for Ace Hotel New York back in 2009. 

Support, Therapy and Instability, a showcase of their most up-to-date paintings, will be ongoing until February 22.


Midtown, New York City

24 BY 36 is 36 artists producing 24 works overnight at Ace Hotel.
12 solo artists and 12 collaborative duos hotel-camping in New York.

We’ve invited a handful of artists to storm the castle, prompted with poems, scores, instructions, drawings, and scraps. We provide the room, the bottle of wine and the foundation-year-style Art Bin full of charcoal sticks and kneaded erasers. And then we get out of their way.

It kicked off last week with a collaborative effort by Sto and his invited accomplice Asha Man. The two laid down a tarp, made an altar, installed tons of small works around said altar, got nude, body-painted, evoked some spirits and in the end, made us a drawing. 

Tonight we’re posting up with JD Samson


Producer Stephen “EIBOL” Galgano and MC Brent “Cidida” Aherns are the lone inhabitants of Young Planet, a dynamic hip hop duo based in Brooklyn. Both are longtime members of our extended Ace family, moonlighting in their off-the-mic time as bellmen at Ace Hotel New York.

The pair are set to release their debut LP, New Fast Automatic, in January. In the mean time, we’re proud to share the record’s debut video, Alex F Ghassan’s merit badge-earning Resurrect on Jupiter.


The meticulous minds at Le Labo have transformed the retail shop above Rudy’s Barbershop at Ace Hotel New York into a world of olfactory wonder. The brainchild of maîtres parfumeurs Fabrice Penot and Edouard Roschi, Le Labo was founded in Grasse — France’s perfume capital — and reared in a small apartment in NYC. 
With the aura of an antique apothecary, this pop-up version of Le Labo’s signature perfume lab maintains the same exacting attention to detail they’re so adored for — with fragrances formulated on site by the staff’s skilled noses to ensure each bottle leaves the shop at its aromatic peak. 
The pop-up sweetens its fragrance offerings by including a selection of laundry detergents, home sprays and hand-made, 100% soy blended candles.

The meticulous minds at Le Labo have transformed the retail shop above Rudy’s Barbershop at Ace Hotel New York into a world of olfactory wonder. The brainchild of maîtres parfumeurs Fabrice Penot and Edouard Roschi, Le Labo was founded in Grasse — France’s perfume capital — and reared in a small apartment in NYC. 

With the aura of an antique apothecary, this pop-up version of Le Labo’s signature perfume lab maintains the same exacting attention to detail they’re so adored for — with fragrances formulated on site by the staff’s skilled noses to ensure each bottle leaves the shop at its aromatic peak. 

The pop-up sweetens its fragrance offerings by including a selection of laundry detergents, home sprays and hand-made, 100% soy blended candles.


This Sunday, Domino Kirke will be spending some quiet time with us at Ace Hotel New York, performing an intimate set in our lobby. London-born and Brooklyn-based, Kirke’s delicate, spindling lullabies have roots in her circuitous history: born to Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke and interior designer Lorraine Kirke — a gene pool she shares with her sister Jemima — she spent the mid-oughts with DOMINO, the eponymous band she fronted until the birth of her son, Cass. With motherhood came a brief musical interlude in which she became a doula, a path that she took to with the same effortless aplomb as she did songwriting.
Her welcome return to music was recently kicked off with The Guard, a new EP produced with members of Lansing-Dreiden and Cibo Matto. We asked Domino to give us a glimpse into her creative process, and share her thoughts on some of the things inspiring her work right now. 

The best thing I ever bought on Etsy… By SecretHolidayCo,  the “It’s OK” banner, hung appropriately above my front door.

My crew, shot by Pamela Hanson for Wool and the Gang. One of my favorite photos of my son and boyfriend to date. Cassius is bitty here, but I love how woes he looks… the oldest soul I know.

When I’m not making music, I work as a Birth Doula. I co-founded a collective in Brooklyn called Carriage House Birth. My Mum found this at a flea market in Miami. It screamed “uterus” when I saw it, so I asked her if we could put in my office in Williamsburg, and it quickly became the center piece of the space. 

My sisters are a constant inspiration to me. Both hugely talented, and intensely beautiful, both inside and out. Here are some paintings my sister, Jemima, did of me and my littlest sister, Lola. The portrait of me was what I ended up using for the cover of my new EP, The Guard. I really felt she captured a new found inner calm that I like to think I acquired after becoming a mother. Hopefully that comes across in these new songs too.

This is my view of the blue ridge mountains from our bedroom porch in Afton, Virginia. I was always so humbled by them each morning. It wasn’t the best time to live there for us — we weren’t quite ready for the middle of nowhere. We came back to Brooklyn after a short while, but we both wrote some good songs, and really slowed down for a time, which was so invaluable for us. So, not for nothing… we’re making our way back there slowly. 

II by Unknown Mortal Orchestra is one of my favorite records in a long time.

This Sunday, Domino Kirke will be spending some quiet time with us at Ace Hotel New York, performing an intimate set in our lobby. London-born and Brooklyn-based, Kirke’s delicate, spindling lullabies have roots in her circuitous history: born to Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke and interior designer Lorraine Kirke — a gene pool she shares with her sister Jemima — she spent the mid-oughts with DOMINO, the eponymous band she fronted until the birth of her son, Cass.
With motherhood came a brief musical interlude in which she became a doula, a path that she took to with the same effortless aplomb as she did songwriting.

Her welcome return to music was recently kicked off with The Guard, a new EP produced with members of Lansing-Dreiden and Cibo Matto. We asked Domino to give us a glimpse into her creative process, and share her thoughts on some of the things inspiring her work right now. 

The best thing I ever bought on Etsy… By SecretHolidayCo,  the “It’s OK” banner, hung appropriately above my front door.

My crew, shot by Pamela Hanson for Wool and the Gang. One of my favorite photos of my son and boyfriend to date. Cassius is bitty here, but I love how woes he looks… the oldest soul I know.

When I’m not making music, I work as a Birth Doula. I co-founded a collective in Brooklyn called Carriage House Birth. My Mum found this at a flea market in Miami. It screamed “uterus” when I saw it, so I asked her if we could put in my office in Williamsburg, and it quickly became the center piece of the space. 

My sisters are a constant inspiration to me. Both hugely talented, and intensely beautiful, both inside and out. Here are some paintings my sister, Jemima, did of me and my littlest sister, Lola. The portrait of me was what I ended up using for the cover of my new EP, The Guard. I really felt she captured a new found inner calm that I like to think I acquired after becoming a mother. Hopefully that comes across in these new songs too.

This is my view of the blue ridge mountains from our bedroom porch in Afton, Virginia. I was always so humbled by them each morning. It wasn’t the best time to live there for us — we weren’t quite ready for the middle of nowhere. We came back to Brooklyn after a short while, but we both wrote some good songs, and really slowed down for a time, which was so invaluable for us. So, not for nothing… we’re making our way back there slowly. 

II by Unknown Mortal Orchestra is one of my favorite records in a long time.


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