New York City, New York
Scotty Albrecht’s work is up at the Ace New York gallery this month. Everything In Between showcases his graphic woodworking, painting and hand done typography. Still plenty of time to see it before Jan 31.

New York City, New York

Scotty Albrecht’s work is up at the Ace New York gallery this month. Everything In Between showcases his graphic woodworking, painting and hand done typography. Still plenty of time to see it before Jan 31.


Dumbo’s LAND Gallery opens a special exhibition at Ace Hotel New York October 3-28, celebrating art by adults with developmental disabilities. Here, a vertical triptych by Michael Pellew Jr.

Dumbo’s LAND Gallery opens a special exhibition at Ace Hotel New York October 3-28, celebrating art by adults with developmental disabilities. Here, a vertical triptych by Michael Pellew Jr.


The Party Wall at MoMA PS1 weaves together the ‘bones’ and ‘blanks’ —  bi-products of skateboard manufacture, subverting the drab conformism of Big Skateboarding to help people party. CODA, the project’s creators, won this year’s Young Architects’ Program with this post-industrial shade source and slip n’ slide, up at PS1 in the wilds of Long Island City throughout Warm Up season. PS1 comrades stopped by to dress our gallery space at Ace Hotel New York with some party wall paraphernalia — stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.

The Party Wall at MoMA PS1 weaves together the ‘bones’ and ‘blanks’ —  bi-products of skateboard manufacture, subverting the drab conformism of Big Skateboarding to help people party. CODA, the project’s creators, won this year’s Young Architects’ Program with this post-industrial shade source and slip n’ slide, up at PS1 in the wilds of Long Island City throughout Warm Up season. PS1 comrades stopped by to dress our gallery space at Ace Hotel New York with some party wall paraphernalia — stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.


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It may have piqued your interest throughout the last twelve months as we posted selections from our online Impossible Project x Ace gallery — and if you entered photos, thank you for fueling this incredible beast that inspired us daily. We’ve now selected a couple dozen images to be included in our physical gallery show One Year In — crowd-sourced and a thing of beauty — at Ace Hotel New York. We’re throwing a little party with Impossible tonight in the lobby to celebrate, and you can see the show in our gallery space through December 14.


Transformation, presented by W Magazine and Hipstamatic, is an exhibit of fashion photos shot and submitted by an image-obsessed diaspora on the WMag FreePak, a limited edition collaborative lens. On display in the Ace Hotel New York gallery space through November 12, we hope it will inspire you to catch the light this winter.

Transformation, presented by W Magazine and Hipstamatic, is an exhibit of fashion photos shot and submitted by an image-obsessed diaspora on the WMag FreePak, a limited edition collaborative lens. On display in the Ace Hotel New York gallery space through November 12, we hope it will inspire you to catch the light this winter.


Ricky’s gallery show en totale, by Anton Lombardi.

Ricky’s gallery show en totale, by Anton Lombardi.


Jason Polan is a NYC-based illustrator and artist who has set his heart on drawing each and every single person in New York. We believe in him entirely. Join us tonight (nowish) for the opening of his gallery show in progress in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York — we’re celebrating Jason’s new book with Seems, People Around Here. You can catch the show in our gallery for the next few weeks.

Jason Polan is a NYC-based illustrator and artist who has set his heart on drawing each and every single person in New York. We believe in him entirely. Join us tonight (nowish) for the opening of his gallery show in progress in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York — we’re celebrating Jason’s new book with Seems, People Around Here. You can catch the show in our gallery for the next few weeks.

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Our gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project Film “24 Hours at Ace” migrated from Ace Hotel New York to The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. 
The exhibit features works by friends of Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project including Andie Acosta, Chloe Aftel, Elijah Wood, Adam Goldberg, Nicole Held, Araks Yeramyan, Jeremy Kost, Anne Bowerman, Michael Nevin, Steve Olson, Dave Ortiz, Devon Turnbull, Pat Sansone and work captured by influencers in Japan curated by The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. 
If you’re lucky enough to be in the hood, it’s up until July 20. If you’re not, you can pick up some keepsake tees on our shop.







Photos by Akisome

Our gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project Film “24 Hours at Ace” migrated from Ace Hotel New York to The Impossible Project Space Tokyo.

The exhibit features works by friends of Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project including Andie Acosta, Chloe Aftel, Elijah Wood, Adam Goldberg, Nicole Held, Araks Yeramyan, Jeremy Kost, Anne Bowerman, Michael Nevin, Steve Olson, Dave Ortiz, Devon Turnbull, Pat Sansone and work captured by influencers in Japan curated by The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. 

If you’re lucky enough to be in the hood, it’s up until July 20. If you’re not, you can pick up some keepsake tees on our shop.

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Photos by Akisome


In honor of Go Skateboarding Day and all its concomitant glory — legal, illegal and otherwise — we’re hosting Skate Related in the Ace New York Gallery space through July 7. The show features prints and designs — by rad folk like Mr. Mike Burrill —  inspired by life on the deck, as well as our Shut x Ace Excelsior skate deck. And yes, that is Justin Beiber. 


Photos by Can’t Stop Won’t Stop

In honor of Go Skateboarding Day and all its concomitant glory — legal, illegal and otherwise — we’re hosting Skate Related in the Ace New York Gallery space through July 7. The show features prints and designs — by rad folk like Mr. Mike Burrill —  inspired by life on the deck, as well as our Shut x Ace Excelsior skate deck. And yes, that is Justin Beiber. 

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Photos by Can’t Stop Won’t Stop


INTERVIEW : WENDY MACNAUGHTON BY JOCELYN K. GLEI
San Francisco-based illustrator and artist Wendy MacNaughton’s illustrations have the improvisational quality of an observer, a lone wolf. She uses illustration to weave a facetious and compassionate homage to the mundanities and Seinfeldesque neuroses that tie us all together. As a sort of visual afterparty to Behance’s 99% Conference, Wendy’s collection Guts, Grit and Getting *%!# Done will be up in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York May 9 - June 8. It’s an illustrated inventory of making ideas happen based on Wendy’s observations, insights and takeaways from the conference.
Jocelyn K. Glei, Director of the 99% Think Tank and Conference, interviewed Wendy about how to change your life by not doing yoga.
How would you describe your work to, say, my grandmother?
First I’d apologize. Then I’d tell her I draw from observation — of people, circumstances, places, life — and tell stories through pictures and words. And no, sorry Nana, not like Norman Rockwell.
You seem to have a particular fascination with pointing out the details — half-empty whiskey glasses, lonely sandwiches, etc. Why?
The little things tell the story — we get swept up by the big picture but I think the little unnoticed details tell us more about what’s really going on.
There are also quite a few pieces related to thinking too much and procrastinating… What’s your preferred mode of procrastination? 
Let me think on that and get back to you. But really, folks. I know if I overthink an idea, it ends up spoiling it. Knowing that, the risk is over thinking not thinking about it. I guess I catch myself coming and going. It’s a challenge to put things aside and just have fun with an idea. That’s what drawing does for me. It clears my head out and I get to play — ideas come on their own.  
You have a lot of sketches from attending book readings… what was the last great book you read?
I beg everyone to read Miranda July’s It Chooses You. Not only is she a great writer, but this true story is super relevant to people working in, on and around technology and who are interested in human connection and storytelling.  
A lot of your illustrations seem to happen in transit (airports, events, street corners) — is there something in particular that’s appealing about transitional spaces and moments?
When in transit, people reflect, mull, worry, remember, sleep… These are all very intimate acts to be doing in a public space. And I love to eavesdrop. So I guess drawing in public is like visual eavesdropping on someone’s private time. It’s also very mediative for me. Drawing allows my brain to stop moving (see question above). Kind of like putting a baby to sleep in a moving car. 
Who or what recently inspired you to do something differently?
At a conference recently a friend asked me what I was going to do the next morning. I said, yoga. He said, do you always go to yoga at home? I said, yes. He said, well since you’re not at home, why not do something you can’t do at home? And i did. And it ended up being a profound, life-altering experience.
(And sorry, I am not telling you what it was.)

INTERVIEW : WENDY MACNAUGHTON BY JOCELYN K. GLEI

San Francisco-based illustrator and artist Wendy MacNaughton’s illustrations have the improvisational quality of an observer, a lone wolf. She uses illustration to weave a facetious and compassionate homage to the mundanities and Seinfeldesque neuroses that tie us all together. As a sort of visual afterparty to Behance’s 99% Conference, Wendy’s collection Guts, Grit and Getting *%!# Done will be up in the gallery space at Ace Hotel New York May 9 - June 8. It’s an illustrated inventory of making ideas happen based on Wendy’s observations, insights and takeaways from the conference.

Jocelyn K. Glei, Director of the 99% Think Tank and Conference, interviewed Wendy about how to change your life by not doing yoga.

How would you describe your work to, say, my grandmother?

First I’d apologize. Then I’d tell her I draw from observation — of people, circumstances, places, life — and tell stories through pictures and words. And no, sorry Nana, not like Norman Rockwell.

You seem to have a particular fascination with pointing out the details — half-empty whiskey glasses, lonely sandwiches, etc. Why?

The little things tell the story — we get swept up by the big picture but I think the little unnoticed details tell us more about what’s really going on.

There are also quite a few pieces related to thinking too much and procrastinating… What’s your preferred mode of procrastination? 

Let me think on that and get back to you. But really, folks. I know if I overthink an idea, it ends up spoiling it. Knowing that, the risk is over thinking not thinking about it. I guess I catch myself coming and going. It’s a challenge to put things aside and just have fun with an idea. That’s what drawing does for me. It clears my head out and I get to play — ideas come on their own.  

You have a lot of sketches from attending book readings… what was the last great book you read?

I beg everyone to read Miranda July’s It Chooses You. Not only is she a great writer, but this true story is super relevant to people working in, on and around technology and who are interested in human connection and storytelling.  

A lot of your illustrations seem to happen in transit (airports, events, street corners) — is there something in particular that’s appealing about transitional spaces and moments?

When in transit, people reflect, mull, worry, remember, sleep… These are all very intimate acts to be doing in a public space. And I love to eavesdrop. So I guess drawing in public is like visual eavesdropping on someone’s private time. It’s also very mediative for me. Drawing allows my brain to stop moving (see question above). Kind of like putting a baby to sleep in a moving car. 

Who or what recently inspired you to do something differently?

At a conference recently a friend asked me what I was going to do the next morning. I said, yoga. He said, do you always go to yoga at home? I said, yes. He said, well since you’re not at home, why not do something you can’t do at home? And i did. And it ended up being a profound, life-altering experience.

(And sorry, I am not telling you what it was.)

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