Arcosanti, AZ
Take exit 263, off of an unassuming stretch of I-17 in central Arizona — go between and beyond the pair of anonymous service stations, to the unpaved and seemingly endless gravel road off in the distance. Take that gravel road. In a mile and a half, you’ll find yourself in the future — or anyway, the future as it was imagined by one man in the late ’60s. This is architect Paolo Soleri’s legacy.

Arcosanti, the unfinished embodiment of Soleri’s utopian “arcology” philosophy, looks a little like a series of set pieces from Tatooine — beautiful retro-futurist concrete apses set against an unforgiving Southwestern landscape. And since his death a year ago today, it’s also become his fitting resting place.

Arcosanti, AZ

Take exit 263, off of an unassuming stretch of I-17 in central Arizona — go between and beyond the pair of anonymous service stations, to the unpaved and seemingly endless gravel road off in the distance. Take that gravel road. In a mile and a half, you’ll find yourself in the future — or anyway, the future as it was imagined by one man in the late ’60s. This is architect Paolo Soleri’s legacy.

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Arcosanti, the unfinished embodiment of Soleri’s utopian “arcology” philosophy, looks a little like a series of set pieces from Tatooine — beautiful retro-futurist concrete apses set against an unforgiving Southwestern landscape. And since his death a year ago today, it’s also become his fitting resting place.


London, UK
Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London. Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.


Artist Alex Chinneck's upside down building.At 20 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8NY 
Photo via Huh Magazine

Artist Alex Chinneck's upside down building.
At 20 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8NY 

Photo via Huh Magazine


This project by Luis Rebelo de Andrade and Tiago Rebelo de Andrade channels our inner wild animal and dreamer. Their Snake Tree Houses in Portugal take a fantasy of living in a tree house and hold it right up against the palpable natural world.


modelarchitecture:

Night Lights by Trevor Young

modelarchitecture:

Night Lights by Trevor Young

Cite Arrow via modelarchitecture

LOS ANGELES
LA-based photographer Peter Bohler captured stills from one of our favorite earthbound fantasias, Arcosanti — the living dream of late Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri who passed this spring at age 93. Some of Peter’s thoughts on Paolo’s invention:


Arcosanti was conceived by Paolo Soleri as a new form of city—one that would exist in harmony with nature and promote community by being free of cars. He called his philosophy arcology, a merging of architecture and ecology. He found a home for his city in Arizona on the edge of a canyon an hour north of Phoenix.
Construction began in 1970, with a crew of volunteers casting Soleri’s sweeping concrete forms in the desert sand. Thirteen buildings were built this way through the 70’s and 80’s, but construction stalled because of a lack of funding. Originally intended to hold 5,000 people, today Arcosanti is home to a transient population of just 50 to 100 people.
Arcosanti supports itself through the creation of bronze and ceramic bells based on Soleri’s design. The residents first complete a five-week workshop on Soleri’s ideas, and then are employed either in the workshops or in the daily operation of the city. They comprise a community of idealists as Arcosanti slips from dream to relic.

LOS ANGELES

LA-based photographer Peter Bohler captured stills from one of our favorite earthbound fantasias, Arcosanti — the living dream of late Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri who passed this spring at age 93. Some of Peter’s thoughts on Paolo’s invention:

Arcosanti was conceived by Paolo Soleri as a new form of city—one that would exist in harmony with nature and promote community by being free of cars. He called his philosophy arcology, a merging of architecture and ecology. He found a home for his city in Arizona on the edge of a canyon an hour north of Phoenix.

Construction began in 1970, with a crew of volunteers casting Soleri’s sweeping concrete forms in the desert sand. Thirteen buildings were built this way through the 70’s and 80’s, but construction stalled because of a lack of funding. Originally intended to hold 5,000 people, today Arcosanti is home to a transient population of just 50 to 100 people.

Arcosanti supports itself through the creation of bronze and ceramic bells based on Soleri’s design. The residents first complete a five-week workshop on Soleri’s ideas, and then are employed either in the workshops or in the daily operation of the city. They comprise a community of idealists as Arcosanti slips from dream to relic.

Arcosanti

Arcosanti

Arcosanti


Prince’s House, a project from The Prince’s Foundation,  is a new kind of vision — making enquiries into our ability to address sustainability while maintaining our relationship with craft and materiality. At times it feels like we’re barreling toward a future where we’ll wear solar powered Snuggies, sunbathe under full-spectrum fluorescent lighting and dissolve high-efficiency miso-probiotic tablets under our tongues for dinner. The Prince sees it differently. No slave to the numbered spectrum of carbon output, but with due respect to contemporary technologies, he and his team aimed to create a prototype for a home that feels like home, while saving money, energy and our beloved Earth for inhabitants one and all. We appreciate that so much care was put into making the house feel as good as it is for the environment — the kinesthetics of living, thriving and being responsible stewards.
You can read about Prince’s House deeply considered materiality and its role in the conversation about sustainability innovation here, here, here and here but we wanted to share some of the details that make us relax a bit at the utterance of the phrase “zero-footprint.” Put away your tinfoil hats and stay awhile.

Prince’s House, a project from The Prince’s Foundation,  is a new kind of vision — making enquiries into our ability to address sustainability while maintaining our relationship with craft and materiality. At times it feels like we’re barreling toward a future where we’ll wear solar powered Snuggies, sunbathe under full-spectrum fluorescent lighting and dissolve high-efficiency miso-probiotic tablets under our tongues for dinner. The Prince sees it differently. No slave to the numbered spectrum of carbon output, but with due respect to contemporary technologies, he and his team aimed to create a prototype for a home that feels like home, while saving money, energy and our beloved Earth for inhabitants one and all. We appreciate that so much care was put into making the house feel as good as it is for the environment — the kinesthetics of living, thriving and being responsible stewards.

You can read about Prince’s House deeply considered materiality and its role in the conversation about sustainability innovation here, here, here and here but we wanted to share some of the details that make us relax a bit at the utterance of the phrase “zero-footprint.” Put away your tinfoil hats and stay awhile.

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Fractal Projections is a play on the idea of the cube broken in space to create an interlocking grid system that follows a linear deformation, allowing them to break from the normal grid behavior into a family of fractal surfaces.
Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles hangs its shingle later this year, and we couldn’t be happier to share a neighborhood with one of our almae matres, SCI-Arc. This Thursday, we’re looking forward to circling like sharks around Evelina Sausina and Eugene Kosgoron’s installation — the winner of SCI-Arc’s 40/40 competition — at the Farmer’s and Merchant’s Bank building for the Downtown LA Artwalk. 40/40 pays homage to architecture and how SCI-Arc alumni have transformed the school over the preceding four decades. Hats off, neighbors.

Fractal Projections is a play on the idea of the cube broken in space to create an interlocking grid system that follows a linear deformation, allowing them to break from the normal grid behavior into a family of fractal surfaces.


Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles hangs its shingle later this year, and we couldn’t be happier to share a neighborhood with one of our almae matres, SCI-Arc. This Thursday, we’re looking forward to circling like sharks around Evelina Sausina and Eugene Kosgoron’s installation — the winner of SCI-Arc’s 40/40 competition — at the Farmer’s and Merchant’s Bank building for the Downtown LA Artwalk. 40/40 pays homage to architecture and how SCI-Arc alumni have transformed the school over the preceding four decades. Hats off, neighbors.


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