One of our favorite dudes in the world, Joe Garvey, painted a new mural in room 1216 at Ace Hotel New York, and then his friend Jonny Baskin took pictures.

One of our favorite dudes in the world, Joe Garvey, painted a new mural in room 1216 at Ace Hotel New York, and then his friend Jonny Baskin took pictures.



In an airship…one travels in a most beautiful way that gives meaning to the word journey.– Hugo Eckener

In 1971 in Belan, Belgium, Antwerp-born Panamarenko née Henri Van Herwegen filled a sculptural airship with hydrogen for an outdoor exhibition. Lacking a level, the balloon (which looked rather like an inflated condom) turned vertically and threatened to go off on its own (rather like that for which a condom is intended), at which point Panamarenko could do nothing but to tear a huge hole in it with scissors to save his life. An exercise in fearless failure, Mr. Herwegen has been, for seventy-three years, imagining impossible vehicles by which we might but won’t travel into the unknown.
Spy on other human-made flying creatures at Libarynth.



Sketch photo by Lorraine at Grijs

In an airship…one travels in a most beautiful way that gives meaning to the word journey.
– Hugo Eckener

In 1971 in Belan, Belgium, Antwerp-born Panamarenko née Henri Van Herwegen filled a sculptural airship with hydrogen for an outdoor exhibition. Lacking a level, the balloon (which looked rather like an inflated condom) turned vertically and threatened to go off on its own (rather like that for which a condom is intended), at which point Panamarenko could do nothing but to tear a huge hole in it with scissors to save his life. An exercise in fearless failure, Mr. Herwegen has been, for seventy-three years, imagining impossible vehicles by which we might but won’t travel into the unknown.

Spy on other human-made flying creatures at Libarynth.

Lighter than air Ace Hotel

Lighter than air Ace Hotel

Sketch photo by Lorraine at Grijs


Mad Science transports artists to the year 2045 to conquer planetary and social issues as scientists. On July 12 at 7pm, the Mad Science laboratory hangs a shingle at Gallery 135 in Portland. If you’re in town, stop by to witness the verdant intersection of art and science and a bunch of people having fun. Featured creatives include friends from Wieden, Nike, iDL and a ton of freestylers, plus music by Jaeho and Gemo Wong. Proceeds from the show will benefit CHAP, a nonprofit organization supporting children in crisis through healing arts programs in Oregon.

Mad Science transports artists to the year 2045 to conquer planetary and social issues as scientists. On July 12 at 7pm, the Mad Science laboratory hangs a shingle at Gallery 135 in Portland. If you’re in town, stop by to witness the verdant intersection of art and science and a bunch of people having fun. Featured creatives include friends from Wieden, Nike, iDL and a ton of freestylers, plus music by Jaeho and Gemo Wong. Proceeds from the show will benefit CHAP, a nonprofit organization supporting children in crisis through healing arts programs in Oregon.


Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi Ace Hotel Japanese Garden Portland


Ace Hotel New York artist Greg Lamarche created this huge collage-based mural with our other friends at Colossal Media.


Thinking Cap is a new evolving series by Atelier Ace making inquires into the creative processes of experimental artists, musicians and personalities. Artists all have their rituals for getting into the heat of their energy. Hemingway would stop working when he had a good idea to save some motivation. Gertrude Stein would only work for 30 minutes each day. Mark Mothersbaugh gets up at 3am to draw every morning. Some people need a certain room or a certain outfit or need to get naked. The Thinking Cap, outfitted with a POV camera, captures that process with all the shakes, swoops and cries of victory in real time.
First up, Evan B. Harris, one of the first muralists at Ace Hotel Portland, and a maker of great omelettes. Next up, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo, and in August our friends from Sword + Fern.
See it all here, and share something about your creative process with us with #athinkingcap and @acehotel. We’ll keep an eye out and send treats to the creators who catch our eye.

Thinking Cap is a new evolving series by Atelier Ace making inquires into the creative processes of experimental artists, musicians and personalities. Artists all have their rituals for getting into the heat of their energy. Hemingway would stop working when he had a good idea to save some motivation. Gertrude Stein would only work for 30 minutes each day. Mark Mothersbaugh gets up at 3am to draw every morning. Some people need a certain room or a certain outfit or need to get naked. The Thinking Cap, outfitted with a POV camera, captures that process with all the shakes, swoops and cries of victory in real time.

First up, Evan B. Harris, one of the first muralists at Ace Hotel Portland, and a maker of great omelettes. Next up, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo, and in August our friends from Sword + Fern.

See it all here, and share something about your creative process with us with #athinkingcap and @acehotel. We’ll keep an eye out and send treats to the creators who catch our eye.


Practically unknown, the work of Panamanian photographic pioneer Carlos Endara Andrade leaves a portrait of a felicitous Panama. With almost messianic determination, he photographed what he saw as a fortunate (even lucky) society, precisely because the engine of its socioeconomic machine was a hulk of contradictions in a constant state of flux. What distinguishes Endara from the photographers of his time is the range of his human and environmental register. With a frontal, direct and eloquent style, he photographed the poor, immigrants, families and couples without confining himself by any means to the wealthy; rather, he photographed people of diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, thus capturing the diversity of humanity that arrived in Panama in search of a better life. Here, he finds pupils at San José School performing the Court of Civilization Allegory in 1905.

From PhotoEspaña

Practically unknown, the work of Panamanian photographic pioneer Carlos Endara Andrade leaves a portrait of a felicitous Panama. With almost messianic determination, he photographed what he saw as a fortunate (even lucky) society, precisely because the engine of its socioeconomic machine was a hulk of contradictions in a constant state of flux. What distinguishes Endara from the photographers of his time is the range of his human and environmental register. With a frontal, direct and eloquent style, he photographed the poor, immigrants, families and couples without confining himself by any means to the wealthy; rather, he photographed people of diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, thus capturing the diversity of humanity that arrived in Panama in search of a better life. Here, he finds pupils at San José School performing the Court of Civilization Allegory in 1905.


From PhotoEspaña


A gifted sculptor, Florida-born Augusta Savage fought poverty, racism and sexism to become a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance, the period of African-American cultural outpouring in New York City during the 1920s and ’30s. Her extraordinary talent opened many doors that led to her becoming one of the most influential teachers of her time and a strong voice for civil rights for African-Americans.
Born in Florida in 1892, she was the seventh of fourteen children born to Edward and Cornelia Fells. As a child, Fells exhibited a talent and a passion for sculpting small objects using red clay she found in her neighborhood. The habit often got her into trouble with her father, a part-time minister, who regarded his child’s handiwork as “graven images” outlawed by the Bible’s 10 Commandments.
Pictured here, The Harp, Ms. Savage’s legendary sculpture based on Lift Every Voice and Sing by James Weldon Johnson.
Read more about Augusta on this incredible blog about the history of slavery in the US, and watch a stock footage clip of Ms. Savage working in her studio.

A gifted sculptor, Florida-born Augusta Savage fought poverty, racism and sexism to become a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance, the period of African-American cultural outpouring in New York City during the 1920s and ’30s. Her extraordinary talent opened many doors that led to her becoming one of the most influential teachers of her time and a strong voice for civil rights for African-Americans.

Born in Florida in 1892, she was the seventh of fourteen children born to Edward and Cornelia Fells. As a child, Fells exhibited a talent and a passion for sculpting small objects using red clay she found in her neighborhood. The habit often got her into trouble with her father, a part-time minister, who regarded his child’s handiwork as “graven images” outlawed by the Bible’s 10 Commandments.

Pictured here, The Harp, Ms. Savage’s legendary sculpture based on Lift Every Voice and Sing by James Weldon Johnson.

Read more about Augusta on this incredible blog about the history of slavery in the US, and watch a stock footage clip of Ms. Savage working in her studio.


Krista Charles draws Google Street Views inside matchbooks with graphite and everybody knows it.

Krista Charles draws Google Street Views inside matchbooks with graphite and everybody knows it.


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