Shoreditch, London
"As an admirer of people who make things but not being an artist myself, being able to see our products used by artists, architects, illustrators, designers and getting their feedback is very rewarding and a privilege."
In the summer of 2012, our friend Julia opened Choosing Keeping, a specialty shop with all corners dedicated to the desk environment — regardless of whether yours is a place of work or creative escape.
Located on iconic Columbia Road — home of the Sunday Flower Market — Choosing Keeping offers a selection of beautifully-made utility objects, plus carefully-curated books and prints to stimulate the discerning synapses. 
Julia’s a passionate, adorable shopkeep — the kind that has us making increasingly regular excuses to stop in. We’re going to need to find some new pen pals.Choosing Keeping128 Columbia RoadLondon E2 7RG

Shoreditch, London

"As an admirer of people who make things but not being an artist myself, being able to see our products used by artists, architects, illustrators, designers and getting their feedback is very rewarding and a privilege."

In the summer of 2012, our friend Julia opened Choosing Keeping, a specialty shop with all corners dedicated to the desk environment — regardless of whether yours is a place of work or creative escape.

Located on iconic Columbia Road — home of the Sunday Flower Market — Choosing Keeping offers a selection of beautifully-made utility objects, plus carefully-curated books and prints to stimulate the discerning synapses. 

Julia’s a passionate, adorable shopkeep — the kind that has us making increasingly regular excuses to stop in. We’re going to need to find some new pen pals.

Choosing Keeping
128 Columbia Road
London E2 7RG


image

Publication Studio hosts the fifth annual Publication Fair at The Cleaners this Sunday, bringing together makers, purveyors and admirers of printed matter in all its shapes and sizes. 






Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.
"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."
Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.

"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."

Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art


Colombia’s Paradero Paralibros Para Parques program has given birth to one hundred miniature libraries all over the South American republic, the majority of which are in Bogotá, Colombia’s main metropolis. The petite libraries are open a scant twelve hours a week, mostly on weekends, and are run by volunteers who also create events for kids and the community and help with homework assignments. Long live print, and long live Colombia’s national literacy organization, Fundalectura, who are responsible for these tiny monuments to the shared power and joy of knowledge.

Colombia’s Paradero Paralibros Para Parques program has given birth to one hundred miniature libraries all over the South American republic, the majority of which are in Bogotá, Colombia’s main metropolis. The petite libraries are open a scant twelve hours a week, mostly on weekends, and are run by volunteers who also create events for kids and the community and help with homework assignments. Long live print, and long live Colombia’s national literacy organization, Fundalectura, who are responsible for these tiny monuments to the shared power and joy of knowledge.


Happy birthday, Aldous.

Happy birthday, Aldous.


Brice Marden from Karma BooksSolomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 19757.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Brice Marden from Karma Books
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 1975
7.5 x 8.5 inches (19.2 x 21.5 cm)

Cite Arrow via karmakarmanyc


Blinky Palermo
"Peter Heisterkamp"Stadtisches Kunstmuseum, Bonn, 198110.5 x 8 inches (26.67 x 20.32 cm)

Blinky Palermo

"Peter Heisterkamp"
Stadtisches Kunstmuseum, Bonn, 1981
10.5 x 8 inches (26.67 x 20.32 cm)

Cite Arrow via karmakarmanyc

Elliott Bay Book Company celebrates 40 years of independent bookselling today in Seattle, Washington, where we also threw down our first roots. After 36 years Downtown, they schlepped their assets over to Capitol Hill, into this 95-year-old warehouse that was once the sole Ford truck service center for Seattle. Now it’s a service center and warm hearth for devotees of the endangered real, live book, and its patron saint, the bookseller. If you’re staying with us in Seattle, you can take a long walk or a short cab ride to this epic church of reading — it’s really worth it.

Elliott Bay Book Company celebrates 40 years of independent bookselling today in Seattle, Washington, where we also threw down our first roots. After 36 years Downtown, they schlepped their assets over to Capitol Hill, into this 95-year-old warehouse that was once the sole Ford truck service center for Seattle. Now it’s a service center and warm hearth for devotees of the endangered real, live book, and its patron saint, the bookseller. If you’re staying with us in Seattle, you can take a long walk or a short cab ride to this epic church of reading — it’s really worth it.


You can’t overestimate how exciting it was to be openly gay in San Francisco in the 1970s. I mean, Stonewall had happened in 1969, gay civil rights legislation was passing in different states, and, you know, for the first time you could love openly and not be considered sick, not be arrested. It was a very exciting, heady time…
Alysia Abbott writes about growing up with her gay dad in SF in the 70s in her new book Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father. As a millenium of civil rights struggles whirs into action before our very eyes — nascent advances are made, fundamental victories are threatened — it’s good to take a close look at those who brought us this far by demanding the right to be themselves.

You can’t overestimate how exciting it was to be openly gay in San Francisco in the 1970s. I mean, Stonewall had happened in 1969, gay civil rights legislation was passing in different states, and, you know, for the first time you could love openly and not be considered sick, not be arrested. It was a very exciting, heady time…

Alysia Abbott writes about growing up with her gay dad in SF in the 70s in her new book Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father. As a millenium of civil rights struggles whirs into action before our very eyes — nascent advances are made, fundamental victories are threatened — it’s good to take a close look at those who brought us this far by demanding the right to be themselves.

Fairyland Memoir

Fairyland Memoir


Shadow puppetry tonight at City Lights Bookstore in SF based on Matt Bell’s novel In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods. Starts in an hour. Get ye.

Shadow puppetry tonight at City Lights Bookstore in SF based on Matt Bell’s novel In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods. Starts in an hour. Get ye.


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