In 1970, President Richard Nixon was scheduled at an American Legion convention in Portland, Oregon, in order to promote the continuation of the Vietnam War. A Portland-based anti-Vietnam War group, called the People’s Army Jamboree, planned a series of demonstrations to be held at the same time as the convention. Law enforcement, expecting massive numbers of protesters on both sides, were concerned about large-scale violence—an FBI report estimated a potential crowd of 25,000 Legionnaires and 50,000 anti-war protestors, and suggested that the result could be worse than the protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.
In order to keep the peace, Republican Oregon Governor Tom McCall made an agreement with representatives of local anti-war factions to permit a rock festival to be held in a state park at the same time as Nixon’s scheduled visit, and to turn a blind eye toward behavior that had been widespread at the Woodstock Festival, like nudity and use of marijuana. McCall has been heard to remark that by making this agreement—less than three months before the upcoming November vote, in which he was running for re-election—he had “committed political suicide.” The festival was often called “The Governor’s Pot Party” by many Oregonians. McCall won re-election that November, defeating opponent Robert W. Straub handily.
- Mike Meacham, barefooted attendee of Vortex I
Our neighbor in Portland, the Dill Pickle Club —- Oregon’s most esteemed grassroots cultural history crew — is creating a comic about this strange and hardly believable tale of a Republican Governor, a bunch of hippies and the complicated sculpting of Oregon’s liberal reputation. The comic will be distributed for free at Tom McCall’s 100th birthday party in Portland this spring — help make it happen on their Kickstarter.

In 1970, President Richard Nixon was scheduled at an American Legion convention in Portland, Oregon, in order to promote the continuation of the Vietnam War. A Portland-based anti-Vietnam War group, called the People’s Army Jamboree, planned a series of demonstrations to be held at the same time as the convention. Law enforcement, expecting massive numbers of protesters on both sides, were concerned about large-scale violence—an FBI report estimated a potential crowd of 25,000 Legionnaires and 50,000 anti-war protestors, and suggested that the result could be worse than the protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

In order to keep the peace, Republican Oregon Governor Tom McCall made an agreement with representatives of local anti-war factions to permit a rock festival to be held in a state park at the same time as Nixon’s scheduled visit, and to turn a blind eye toward behavior that had been widespread at the Woodstock Festival, like nudity and use of marijuana. McCall has been heard to remark that by making this agreement—less than three months before the upcoming November vote, in which he was running for re-election—he had “committed political suicide.” The festival was often called “The Governor’s Pot Party” by many Oregonians. McCall won re-election that November, defeating opponent Robert W. Straub handily.

- Mike Meacham, barefooted attendee of Vortex I


Our neighbor in Portland, the Dill Pickle Club —- Oregon’s most esteemed grassroots cultural history crew — is creating a comic about this strange and hardly believable tale of a Republican Governor, a bunch of hippies and the complicated sculpting of Oregon’s liberal reputation. The comic will be distributed for free at Tom McCall’s 100th birthday party in Portland this spring — help make it happen on their Kickstarter.


We wanted to share this with you — one of the hands-down spookiest photos of all time taken at the recent Dill Pickle Club Perfect Pickle fundraiser at Ace Hotel Portland. Some unseen (to us) force is luring these two women away from a table full of perfect pickle samples and into its evil clutches.
Anyways, the Dill Pickle Club is really great, and we prefer that it not be an unseen force, but rather something you’re paying a lot of attention to. You can join up on their website.

Photo by Ed Klein

We wanted to share this with you — one of the hands-down spookiest photos of all time taken at the recent Dill Pickle Club Perfect Pickle fundraiser at Ace Hotel Portland. Some unseen (to us) force is luring these two women away from a table full of perfect pickle samples and into its evil clutches.

Anyways, the Dill Pickle Club is really great, and we prefer that it not be an unseen force, but rather something you’re paying a lot of attention to. You can join up on their website.



Photo by Ed Klein


The Dill Pickle Club

We like The Dill Pickle Club. They care about place and history and the creative and self-motivated people who make culture, independently and without promise of financial return or great acclaim. Through tours and public presentations in Portland, one of our favorite cities, they create non-traditional avenues for learning “where all forms of knowledge are valued.”

Tonight at The Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland, they’re holding a fundraiser by challenging several local chefs to create the perfect pickle. The benefit marks the beginning of an exciting year wherein The DPC works with Publication Studio to re-release four out-of-print books about Portland — art, oral history, architecture, and local culture — that will accompany a year-long, roving lecture series at symbolic locations around the city.

The books — low-budget, immeasurably important documents of local eras — reflect the fabric of Portland’s weird, rebellious, vibrant and radically earnest culture. Here are some selected pages from Twenty Seven Installations and Rubbings From the Rose City. Keep an eye out on their site for more about the books, the lectures, and other ways you can pick up what they’re throwing down.


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