Downtown Los Angeles
Takashi Murakami and some unidentified revelers celebrate Friday’s screening of Jellyfish Eyes at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. 
Photo courtesy of riyo_oko

Downtown Los Angeles

Takashi Murakami and some unidentified revelers celebrate Friday’s screening of Jellyfish Eyes at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. 

Photo courtesy of riyo_oko


London

Mr. X here talking about the meaning of self, tattooing, life and fatherhood. That minimal piano music you hear in the background is by Russ Chimes. Alex Nicholson makes the tattoos of Mr. X slowly melt into his skin throughout the film.  

Tattooing has been in important part of human cultures for over 5000 years. From the aristocracy in England to sea-farers the world over to indigenous peoples on most every continent, it’s been a way to distinguish and express ourselves. It’s nice to hear such a soft and connected voice speaking about how meaningful it is to commit to a piece of art for one’s life. Tattoos are the only artform that change with a person throughout their life, slowly blurring and melding with the skin.     

"I like the black ink in the skin. ‘Cos it’s not really black — it’s this funny bluish stuff. It’s India ink — it’s basically carbon. Which is what we’re made of." 


Do you like animals with red eyes, house music and what could in fact be the visual representation of Leibniz's monads? Us too. Universal Everything made a video combining them. Tonight we’re going to take a walk around the hotel with our headphones on. We’ll be envisioning this video projected over darkened buildings and streets as we traipse the town.  


Portland, OR
John Jay is everywhere, like a feeling, or like air, and he might have even invented #hashtags. More important: he’s a good friend and move-buster and a mind with that hair-trigger twitch to engage culture in all its shapeshifting splendor.
Leading up to his talk at Semi-Permanent he spoke with Marketing Magazine about creativity and culture and his relationship with our dear, dear departed Alex. 

Photo by Matthew Furman

Portland, OR

John Jay is everywhere, like a feeling, or like air, and he might have even invented #hashtags. More important: he’s a good friend and move-buster and a mind with that hair-trigger twitch to engage culture in all its shapeshifting splendor.

Leading up to his talk at Semi-Permanent he spoke with Marketing Magazine about creativity and culture and his relationship with our dear, dear departed Alex. 

Photo by Matthew Furman


Life loves the liver of it. —Maya Angelou 

Life loves the liver of it. —Maya Angelou 


Yonkers, NY
Steven Tyler, 1967. Funny cigarettes. 

Yonkers, NY

Steven Tyler, 1967. Funny cigarettes. 




You have not grown too old 
and it is not too late
to dive into your increasing depths
where life calmly gives out
its own secret

― Rainer Maria Rilke
Swimmers by Wayne Levin.

You have not grown too old 

and it is not too late

to dive into your increasing depths

where life calmly gives out

its own secret

― Rainer Maria Rilke

Swimmers by Wayne Levin.


London, UK


Photos from Derek Ridgers' book 78-87 London Youth.

London, UK

Photos from Derek Ridgers' book 78-87 London Youth.


Jean-Luc Godard gives a dramatic reading of Hannah Arendt.  


"The higher up you go, the more mistakes you are allowed. Right at the top, if you make enough of them, it’s considered to be your style." — Fred Astaire

"The higher up you go, the more mistakes you are allowed. Right at the top, if you make enough of them, it’s considered to be your style."
— Fred Astaire


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