Basel, Switzerland 

Twin dreamboats Simon and Nikolai Haas are presently showing work as part of Art Basel — that global art free-for-all at the nexus of Europe’s contemporary arts scene. The Haas Bros have been working steadily out of their Downtown LA studio since 2010, just a stone’s throw from our spot, making some of the most endearing stuff we’ve ever set eyes on — so much so that we had them prominently tag up the walls here.
They gave us a private peak at Art Basel show last week, and were kind enough to let us share their “Advocates For the Sexual Outsider” — the show’s liberation manifesto of sorts.
Congrats, boys.

Basel, Switzerland 

Twin dreamboats Simon and Nikolai Haas are presently showing work as part of Art Basel — that global art free-for-all at the nexus of Europe’s contemporary arts scene. The Haas Bros have been working steadily out of their Downtown LA studio since 2010, just a stone’s throw from our spot, making some of the most endearing stuff we’ve ever set eyes on — so much so that we had them prominently tag up the walls here.

They gave us a private peak at Art Basel show last week, and were kind enough to let us share their “Advocates For the Sexual Outsider” — the show’s liberation manifesto of sorts.

Congrats, boys.


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Downtown Los Angeles

Simon and Lukas. The Haas Brothers. These true LA darlings and dear, new friends evidently didn’t get enough of us while outfitting LA Chapter and our mezzanine bar with smart pencil drawings of deeply-plumbed references to LA’s social history. Here’s some evidence of their enduring and inspirational presence. If you see them, say hello.



Downtown Los Angeles, CA
High above the crisp regency patterns of the lobby at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles — every detail carefully selected by our old friends at Commune Design, with eastern light glossing every surface — something a little looser begins to take shape.
Artists Simon and Nikolai Haas are hard at work on a larger-than-life mural populated by intimate pencil drawings of figures and landscapes both familiar and forgotten, like ancient film stills burned into into a projection screen long after the last pair of eyes to appreciate it has left the theater. It’s a visual history of Hollywood closer to hieroglyphics than hi-def graphics.
The hallucinatory zeal of the Haas Brothers’ custom fabrications has won them high-profile commissions on the order of Versace, Guerlain and Gaga, but it was the simplicity of Simon’s fast, freehand portraits and sketches that drew the attention of Commune co-founder Roman Alonso when imagining ways to give these blank lobby walls an unexpected, vital role in the new space. 
The drawings themselves are neither fully immersive nor entirely remote, highlighting the compromising situations our cultural icons occasionally tumble into. The brothers “present, rather than venerate” their subject matter, yielding interpretation over exaltation as history continues to write itself, with or without us.
Article by Christopher MauldinPhotos by Jacqueline Bao

Downtown Los Angeles, CA

High above the crisp regency patterns of the lobby at Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles — every detail carefully selected by our old friends at Commune Design, with eastern light glossing every surface — something a little looser begins to take shape.

Artists Simon and Nikolai Haas are hard at work on a larger-than-life mural populated by intimate pencil drawings of figures and landscapes both familiar and forgotten, like ancient film stills burned into into a projection screen long after the last pair of eyes to appreciate it has left the theater. It’s a visual history of Hollywood closer to hieroglyphics than hi-def graphics.

The hallucinatory zeal of the Haas Brothers’ custom fabrications has won them high-profile commissions on the order of Versace, Guerlain and Gaga, but it was the simplicity of Simon’s fast, freehand portraits and sketches that drew the attention of Commune co-founder Roman Alonso when imagining ways to give these blank lobby walls an unexpected, vital role in the new space. 

The drawings themselves are neither fully immersive nor entirely remote, highlighting the compromising situations our cultural icons occasionally tumble into. The brothers “present, rather than venerate” their subject matter, yielding interpretation over exaltation as history continues to write itself, with or without us.

Article by Christopher Mauldin
Photos by Jacqueline Bao


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