INTERVIEW : BEN SWANK OF THIRD MAN RECORDS

Ben Swank is a former Soledad Brothers drummer, cofounder — with Jack White and Ben Blackwell — of Third Man Records and sometimes Rolling Record Store truck driver and vinyl slinger. He was circling our block at Ace New York in the Third Man Rolling Record Store as our CMJ shindig Notes From the Underground got started — looking for a spot to land for the weekend and shill wax — and he kindly double parked for a moment to chat with us about the state of music and stuff. Catch him in the shop outside Ace New York today from 5pm til around midnight.

Do you have any insider info on the Blunder-Blue vinyl recipe?

It’s a mixture of polyvinyl chloride (CH2=CHCI), salt, oil and polymerized chlorine resin mixed with MK Ultra Blue Tab 25 disco dust.

You’ve been a pretty outspoken advocate for musicians placing their livelihoods over 90s style concerns about indie street cred. Is there anything you’d consider going too far? Would you advise an artist to license their song so that it’s activated by the opening of Big Mac boxes? 

It’s all what the artist is comfortable with. It’s an individual choice in the same way a person may enjoy the disgusting endorphin rush of a Big Mac over the smug self-satisfaction of a nice kale salad. I think it’s pretty difficult to “sell out” these days. It’s tough for up-and-coming bands to get by. It’s probably weird for fans to hear The Strange Boys in a computer commercial or Eddy Current Suppression Ring hawking AT&T… but I just think, at least they are paying some bills. The corporate landscape is different now. There’s rock’n’roll kids working for advertising companies. Sounds silly, but seriously that’s ridiculous. You wouldn’t have heard Tad in a Pepsi commercial (despite having THE BEST song about Pepsi) because in the 90s slackers didn’t work at ad firms. Or work at all. Cause it was the 90s and everyone was depressed and serious. 

Has somebody ever given you a demo when you totally thought the conversation was not leading to giving you a demo, but then it did, but it was cool ‘cause it was actually really good?

That hasn’t happened… but some kid posted on my Facebook page the other day with his band and at first I was pissed about it — the flagrant self-advertising. But I listened to it and it was really good and I kind of learned a lesson that day.

Has the Third Man Rolling Record Store ever gotten a flat? Does it carry a spare and a jack?

Not a flat, but it’s on the road a lot so it has had some issues pop up. Usually, it’s finding a cool mechanic that can sort it out right away that just wants to work on a cool truck. But usually they’re just like, “What the hell is this thing? You sell records?” And then they shake their heads in disapproval at us and shame us.

Will rock’n’roll ever die?

Yes, please.

Photo of Swank in his office by Jo McCaughey on Nashville Scene.


INTERVIEW : TINA SNOW LE OF DESIGN WEEK PORTLAND

Tina Snow Le is a local genius of petite stature and outsized brain skills. She is also on the Action Team for the first ever Design Week Portland and the in-house graphics maestro at Solestruck (where we are about to buy an obscene amount of footwear in twenty minutes). Amidst the fantastic chaos of her life and in a cloud of gentle profanities, Tina answered some questions from comrade and Ace designer Martie Flores.

What connections do you find between your work, personal projects and everyday interactions?

They’re all mostly fueled by lack of sleep and a ton of yerba maté. My family has always instilled in me the value of hard work and I hold true to that. I absolutely enjoy what I do and feel fortunate to even have the opportunity to make something everyday. I don’t ever feel like I’m working; the line between work and play doesn’t exist. I think the biggest challenge of that is giving people and projects the attention they deserve. It’s important to me to be honest, be kind and to give my best at all times. My friend Ashley has always told me, “If it’s worth doing, then it’s worth doing right,” and I foster that in everything that I do.

What would you like to see graphic design do for others?

You know that moment when you fall in love, and that thought beautifully haunts you to where you can’t think of anything else? This feeling of being in love is the reason why I am a designer; this is why I make. I get to fall in love again every single day. I hope that graphic design can help others feel the same way that I do about design, even if the subject is not anywhere near related.

How would you make someone fall in love with graphic design? 

I don’t like making anyone do anything, or tell anyone what to do or how to do things. I get excited about things and like to share what I’m excited about with others. I probably use more exclamation marks than anyone will ever use in their lifetime, and my caps lock button is broken on my keyboard. Energy is contagious, and I can only hope that somebody out there will enjoy what I love as much as I do.

What are you doing now and what do you want to do to improve yourself as a designer?

I thrive when design is fused with community to create an experience that is exciting, engaging and, most of all, fun. It’s important for me to put myself in uncomfortable situations, because that’s when I feel like I learn the most. I want to use design to solve problems that don’t necessarily have anything have to do with design and have fun with it at the same time. If I can’t figure something out, I try to find a way or make one.

What’s one thing everyone, designer or not, should remember?

Lose your entitlement, not your integrity. 

If you only made animated gifs for one person, who would it be and why?

It would be for my mentor and friend Kate Bingaman-Burt. Gosh I freaking love this woman and, honestly, who doesn’t? Kate and the Portland State Graphic Design program are to blame for all this trouble I’m causing with graphic design. If anyone loves a fat cat eating pizza while surrounded by hot dogs with lasers shooting around, it would be her.

What is your role in Design Week Portland? What do you want to do for it next year?

My role is to coordinate the open house portion of Design Week where 60+ businesses, studios, firms, and shops all over Portland open their doors to the public. I’m overwhelmed by the generous hospitality of the design community here, and so proud of our city for getting together to make this week happen. I don’t think any of the organizers, including myself, had any idea how big Design Week was going to get, especially with it being the first year in Portland. It’s been rewarding to see all of the events unravel and to hear the discussions all around town between designers and non-designers. I feel so honored to be a part of it, and I hope to cause even more trouble with the supreme dream team next year.


INTERVIEW : ROSCOE ORMAN OF SESAME STREET

Roscoe Orman has played the character of Gordon on Sesame Street since 1974. We caught up with him in advance of his appearance at this year’s New York Comic Con to talk about what it’s like to spend nearly four decades in a happy place surrounded by good people and mythical creatures (a lot like our jobs, in fact).

Gordon occupies this poignantly innocent place for at least a couple generations of grownups and a whole bunch of kids. How has a mere mortal lived up to being Gordon for all these years?

Well, for all of us who have done Sesame Street for so many years — we’re all a part of a team that’s committed to children and that is such a big part of who we all are as artists and workers. Sesame Street is us. What we’ve become is synonymous with what’s known as Sesame Street. And in fact it’s one of the easiest, most fun jobs that I’ve done. It comes quite easily because of that rapport that we have with each other and the common bond that we share.

It seems like that rapport extends to the viewing audience as well. It feels like we know these Sesame Street characters.

Yeah, I think so. I think there’s a strong identification with us, including us human cast members who have matured and aged over the years but are still recognizable, that those who grew up watching us feel like they know us. They know us intimately and when we’re doing any kind of an appearance together in public, it can become an emotional experience for people who have all those memories with us.

As for the non-human characters, Elmo, for example, was around for years before he broke out and became a star. Are there any muppets on the precipice of being a superstar? Is Hoots the Owl one performance away?

Funny you mention Hoots the Owl. I haven’t seen Hoots for a number of years, but he was performed by Kevin Clash who does Elmo as well. Kevin is a creative force. He grew up with this dream of working with Jim Henson and it’s a dream that came true. What emanates from all his performances is this incredible enthusiasm and love and spontaneity. He’s really in the moment and enjoying everything each time he puts on that little red monster. The entire group of puppeteers have a kind of synergy together that’s wonderful to watch. Of course, everyone has their favorites. In my case, it’s Grover.

It’s been nearly thirty years since Will Lee, who played the character of Mr. Hooper, passed away and the producers of Sesame Street decided to deal with that directly with the famous “Farewell Mr. Hooper” episode, in which Gordon consoles Big Bird. There have been references to Mr. Hooper throughout the years, including recently. Big Bird still keeps a drawing of him above his nest. Those kinds of things demonstrate this genuine commitment to the human ethos of the show. What’s it like to be part of something like that?

I remember when that decision was being made and the producers and writers really thought it was an opportunity for them to address a very difficult topic which most children at some point in their lives will experience. It was a brave move, but I thought it was handled really well. It aired on Thanksgiving, so families could be together when they watched it and it was an educational moment for all of us. Those of us who were in that episode were experiencing the grieving process in a genuine, real-time way. It wasn’t something that we had to try to create, and I think that came through. Those kinds of difficult issues are something that Sesame Street occasionally steps up and confronts and deals with in a way that reflects how we educate children about not only letters and numbers but feelings and community.

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INTERVIEW : REGGIE WATTS

Reggie Watts performs tonight at Ace Hotel New York with The Dance Cartel at On the Floor in Liberty Hall. He woke up early to do his hair and found a few moments to talk to us about life, love, luxury problems and Comedy Bang Bang.

How is your morning, er afternoon, going?

Uh, it’s going good. Not out of bed yet, but I’m getting there.

You’ve just been taking interviews from bed? That sounds pretty good.

It’s not bad, it’s fun.

You’re a busy man. Last week when we were having technical problems you were like “Okay you have ten minutes. I have another one in ten minutes, then ten minutes before that.” That doesn’t sound like very much fun for you. Or maybe it is.

Well sometimes it can be. It’s just a matter of it lining up or not. Sometimes people will not call or they will forget. Something like that. Then sometimes they will call a little bit later and then the whole thing is derailed. “I’ll call you ten minutes later, then ten minutes later.” That can be weird, but it’s fine. Literally almost everything is worse than that.

They are first world problems, it’s true. Have things been kind of blowing up since Comedy Bang Bang premiered?

Yeah. Yeah, I think so. I think I definitely noticed people a little bit more. I mean people notice me more is what I meant to say. Ha.

You and Alex (Calderwood) are old friends from Seattle.

Yeah, I’ve known him probably since, I’m going to guess like 1996 or something like that maybe. He was throwing parties at — I can’t remember the name of the club, it was right under the monorail. It was the only thing in town that really had any elegance or sophistication to it when it comes to parties. They were killin’ it. But yeah they were cool guys, I’ve known them forever. I love the Ace.

I interviewed Vijay Iyer recently when he was coming to Portland for the Jazz Festival. We were talking about jazz being this democratic wildland where anything can happen. And I was watching some videos of your work on YouTube and various places over the last week, and thinking that jazz and comedy feel kind of related. Especially the sort of performance you do — it’s pretty singular — you have peers in the comedy world and peers in the music world, but what you do with them is sort of unprecedented. I was wondering if you feel like there is some feedback loop with how you approach comedy and how you think about improvisational music, and if they feel related to you in any way?

Yeah, they are definitely related. I mean, if you can improvise in music and if you have a love of music you can just transpose that to being more lyrical. It’s the same technique, it just depends on what you understand. Improvisation is inherent in any art form.

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INTERVIEW : THANKS FOR THE VIEW, MR. MIES, EDITORS

Lafayette Park is the Cinderella of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s bold roster of work. In the heart of Downtown Detroit, it is one of the city’s most economically and racially diverse and stable communities, but has never received acclaim equal to that of Mies’ similar projects, due in part to its residence in a struggling, iconic American city some would like to turn away from.

We love Detroit, and we are equally in awe of Mies’ otherworldly alchemy of earthly grandiosity and ethereal refinement. After a recent book launch for Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies: Lafayette Park, Detroit — published by Metropolis Books — at Project No.8 off the Ace New York lobby, we interviewed editors Danielle Aubert, Lana Cavar and Natasha Chandani of Placement about this communal glass house, its maker and what it all means.

In contrast to other planned Modernist communities being tested at the time, Lafayette Park seems successful on many levels such as sensitivity to scale and circulation by pedestrians and automobiles alike. But the beautiful integration of landscape design throughout the project is remarkable. How much is known of the collaboration between Mies and Alfred Caldwell, the landscape architect for the project? Did Mies envision the long term importance of the landscape design to Lafayette Park?

Yes! The landscape design is a huge reason that Lafayette Park is such a great place to live. There is a bit of research on the relationship between Mies and Caldwell, they collaborated on many projects and were both on the faculty at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in Chicago. When Lafayette Park was first built in the late 1950s/early 1960s there was not enough of a budget to buy grown trees, so they planted saplings. The landscaping really became a lush, green environment in the late 1970s. Today the trees attract migrating birds and it’s become a kind of active habitat for wildlife.

When I first visited Lafayette park I was struck by how tidy all the window dressings and interior decor as seen through the expansive windows were. Le Corbusier had a famously adverse reaction when residents of his Pessac housing project decided to modify and decorate his rational modernist sculptures (and windows) to their personal tastes. In Lafayette Park does the architecture inspire the residents to neatness or do rules do this?

In the high-rises in Lafayette Park, residents have to use vertical blinds on their windows, but in the townhouses there are not actually any rules about what kinds of window treatments people can put up. That said, people are generally motivated not to obstruct the view. But, as with every neighborhood, some people are neat and some are messy.

In the end architecture is for the people who inhabit it and for the cities that they together create. The title of your book may imply more that just what you ‘view’ through the glass but thanking Mies for his view on how we should live. What are some of the key lessons architects could learn from this project through the point of view of the residents who have lived happily in Lafayette Park through the years?

The neighborhood’s designers –- Mies, Caldwell, Ludwig Hilberseimer, the urban planner, and Herbert Greenwald, the developer -– were clearly very aware of the importance of designing spaces that would encourage strong relationships between residents. But in the high-rises, which are rentals, it’s clear that the building’s management is of equal, or greater, importance to the health of the community in that building. In the townhouses, which are co-operatively owned, the neighbors’ reliance on one another is what creates strong bonds.

We’re not sure how Mies wanted people to live in his buildings, but there are many people who don’t share the minimal/spare side of his aesthetic who love living in the spaces he designed. The views through the windows contribute to the relationships people have with the city, the trees and each other. That said, as one resident who lives in the neighborhood put it to us, people “come for the architecture, but they stay for the neighbors.”

All photos shot on expired PX 70 Color Shade on an Polaroid SX-70 by this Detroit photographer.


INTERVIEW : QUINTRON & MISS PUSSYCAT

In honor of ATP’s I’ll Be Your Mirror festival this weekend in New York, we introduce Quintron & Miss Pussycat of New Orleans, Louisiana — two weirdos who make the world turn. Catch them plus Dirty 3, Frank Ocean, Philip Glass and The Roots — we have a friendly deal on rooms and tickets here. 

Quintron has been making genre-defying noise and Swamp-Tech dance music in New Orleans for over fifteen years. Psychedelic New Orleans soul and garage R&B filtered through a distorted Hammond B-3 and a cache of self-made electronic instruments have become his creative signature. A genre-less oracle of sound, Quintron has produced strange soundscapes based on inner-city field recordings of frogs and neighborhood ambiance, and holed himself up in The New Orleans Museum Of Art for three months to create the epic “Sucre Du Sauvage”. His most significant creation has to be the The Drum Buddy — a light activated analog synthesizer that creates murky, low-fidelity, rhythmic patterns — used by Laurie Anderson, Fred Armisen and other people in the know.

Miss Pussycat is Quintron’s permanent collaborator — a master puppeteer, vocalist and maracas shaker. Hers are complex, beautiful crafted stagings, with electronically pixilated soundtracks, seedy characters and trippy black light effects (a holy trinity if we ever saw one).

Tell us what you’ve been up to.

We just released a live album on Third Man, Quintron invented a weather-controlled synth called the Singing House, our song “Chatterbox” was nominated for a Grammy and we are currently working on a new puppet film called “The Mystery in Old Bathbath” due out in November.

How do you feel about playing in New York this weekend?

We feel good. Our excitement level is currently medium but we expect it to be raised to “very high” as the magic hour approaches! 

Who else are you excited about seeing at IBYM?

Phillip Glass (huge, huge fans), Magic Band Magic Band Magic Band!!, Makeup, Oh Sees…everything.

What’s your most memorable New York show to date?

C-Squat has to be up there at the very top. We left the show after we played and came back an hour later to find everyone playing our instruments.

If you were curating the festival this year, name three bands you would pick to play the stage with you. 

The Residents might be first pick (they are Louisiana natives after all). And we would actually try to get Bohannon…he is still alive and living in Georgia and he just put an amazing new record out….this dude is basically responsible for modern house but he does it with a real band. We would get Cave (Chicago prog) and ZZZ (awesome Netherlands organ psych rock), King Louie (any one of his legendary bands would do — Kajun SS, Missing Monuments, Persuaders, One Man Band, etc., etc.), and oh man….we would go nuts. The Oblivions (with the Quintron line-up of course) and so much more.

Of course we would also get some New Orleans Bounce! Vockah Redu, Big Freedia, Katy Red (the OG and best of em all), etc…all awesome!

Sorry…that was more than three. 

What have you liked about ATP events in the past?

We played one of the first events in England, and the most impressive thing was that the television in all of the cabins was curated as well. We would DEFINITELY do that! Just fill up 72 hours of psychedelic puppet films from all over the world…we have an enormous collection of that kind of thing.

What record are you currently listening to?

Bohannon’s “Dance your Ass Off” and a psychedelic kids’ christmas album called “Chester The Chubby Elf” (narrated by Percy Penguin).


INTERVIEW : TAVI GEVINSON

Tavi Gevinson is starting to become just Tavi — like Cher. She could be a Bob and would still be THE Bob. She’s just insanely special, and we were head over heels honored to collaborate again with Tavi and her team at Rookie for Fashion Week this year to celebrate Rookie’s one year anniversary and the launch of their new book, Rookie Yearbook One, at Ace Hotel New York. Bob took some time out of her creative hurricane to talk to us about what Rookie means to her, trying to relax and what the future holds.

You’re living an unconventional life for a teenager — absorbing and experiencing stuff way beyond the confines of what high school can offer. If you were to invent a Rookie school, what would the curriculum be like? How do you think elements of that could be imbued into normal, every day high schools to change the lives of teenage girls, boys and everyone else?

I’m not comfortable even theorizing about How to Change the Schools of America, but Freaks and Geeks and Daniel Clowes’ work each blessed me with a sense of appreciation for human misery, and that outlook certainly changed what I get out of my school experience. Also, one of my teachers once told a story about his dad taking him shopping at Wal-Mart when everyone else in his school wore Ralph Lauren polos. He was horrified by the prospect of someone from his school seeing him there and him feeling embarrassed, but realized that in order for one of his peers to see him at Wal-Mart, they, too, would have to be at Wal-Mart. High school is terrible but learning is good and people are interesting and we’re all in Wal-Mart together.

Rookie has had a couple of articles that mention transgender, gay, lesbian and queer folks, but not a huge amount of content. The magazine is “for teenage girls” — does this ever feel clunky or ill-fitting when you think about reaching a trans, queer or gender variant audience of young people?

We’re always looking to expand the definitions of what girls can do and be, and looking for readers to share their stories through Rookie as well, so while our first year has meant a lot of figuring out who our audience is and what they would like to see from us, it doesn’t feel clunky at all to welcome all kinds of people into Rookie. Supporting girls also means sometimes questioning what it means to be a girl (or a boy), and we’ll keep on doing that.

How do you make time to daydream, create, space out and do nothing/everything with such an insane schedule? A lot of people don’t have to learn that skill until they’re much older, and most of us still struggle to figure it out, present company included. Do you think “success” ever takes a toll on your creative life or your psyche?

For each day I have different time units, like Hugh Grant in About a Boy: school, Rookie, friends, relaxing, my own creative projects, etc. I usually have to sacrifice at least one of these units on a regular school day. I’ve learned that I prefer the stress of trying to do everything I want, to the stress of wondering if I should do everything I want. I’ve also learned that it’s better to just do things all the time than sit around and think about how much shit I have to do and what to do next.

I asked S.E. Hinton a similar question when I interviewed her for Lula, not about her schedule specifically, but about the downsides of success in general. She said simply that success didn’t feel like as big a burden as no success would feel. My life is very stressful, but a lot of it comes from expectations I have for myself. I don’t feel like I got talked into anything or signed up for something I didn’t know I couldn’t handle. The fact that I even get to do all this and people will look at it is an extreme privilege, so it’s stressful, but I’m not complaining. I don’t really feel like my “success” takes a toll on my creative life or my psyche because all the projects I do that technically make me successful are my creative life and psyche — they’re creative outlets and places for me to express myself.

Tell us about some of your hopes and dreams for Rookie in year two.

I always want us to be bigger and better and all of that stuff, but it’s too scary to delve into the details right now.

Photograph of Tavi by Emily Berl for The New York Times


INTERVIEW : NAOMI POMEROY OF BEAST - JULIA CHILD’S 100TH BIRTHDAY
At this point, neither Julia Child nor Naomi Pomeroy really need an introduction. Naomi’s Beast in Portland, Oregon, and the spectacular food she serves there, have catapulted her to a solid seat among culinary greats from every generation and culture. She is one of the most genuine, hard-working, creative, ambitious and inspiring people we know — a lot like Our Lady of the Ladle herself. On Julia’s 100th birthday, we were privileged to get a few words from Naomi (while prepping for tonight’s prix-fixe) about cucumbers, love and one of her icons.
Did Julia Child have an influence on you as a kid?
Totally. My mom sas raised in a Southern California household with a mom whose idea of dinner was unseasoned turkey and iceberg salad. In 1968, my mom moved to Corvallis to attend OSU. As an 18 year old, finally free from her mom’s weird ideas about food, my mother taught herself to cook. Much of this was achieved through her forays into Mastering the Art of French Cooking. By the time I was born my mom was an avid cook… Thanks Julia!! 
How did she bridge the feminized domestic arts with the male-dominated world of culinary arts?
Julia was always unapologetic. I like that. Dudes never apologize for their choices in the kitchen… She didn’t either — But she was soft, and full of heart. And that combo really made her (and her food) shine.
Julia’s romance with Paul Child seemed to be an enormous source of support and inspiration. How do partnerships fuel creativity and productiveness?
As people who cook for a living, we really need the support of people around us. We aren’t saving lives or anything… But sometimes our hours are similar to ER doctors! 
I don’t like to call chefs “artists” — but at the same time, we are vulnerable. We make things for people to consume right in front of us. That leaves us unshielded sometimes from what people think — and we are sensitive! I would guess for the majority of us, we really want to take care of people. It’s in our NATURE. So we sometimes take our little failures home with us… We need a listening ear when it comes to that. I recently got married, and my husband Kyle is great for this. I really love that I can talk about new ideas, or little issues, and he listens… Doesn’t advise really — just hears me. It really helps.
One thing about Julia Child is that she so clearly loved life. Do you think chefs are happier people?
I do think chefs are happier…usually. Sometimes we get too caught up in perfection and complexity though. I think that is why Julia makes such a great role model. She really showcased what is best about a GOOD chef. When something doesn’t go right, you just laugh, and turn to something else… It is a kitchen! We are COOKING and if we aren’t happy, we certainly SHOULD be. We are all so lucky to be doing what we love for work. 
What’s next for Beast? What should we stay tuned for?
I wait for the right opportunities — I don’t force things. Back in the Spring I thought I was going to move locations, but then a good agreement that was best for the business  couldn’t be reached… It’s OK. I always wait for what feels right.
I was just asked by Time magazine to cover a food-related trip for an upcoming piece that runs in September. I had a blast traveling in Corsica and studying the food there… Who knows? Travel writing or travel TV? Or a cookbook?? It’s all up in the air, but it’s all wonderful too.
Any recipes you want to share on this important day?
I say this — if you haven’t tried to sauté cucumbers…do! They are wonderful. I add some onion as well, and finish with a little squeeze of lemon juice or champagne vinegar and a tiny pinch of sugar… It’s like Julia’s, only a little adapted.
Peel or partially peel cucumbers, cut in half lengthwise and then into strips. Toss with vinegar, salt and sugar and let stand anywhere from thirty minutes to several hours. Drain and pat dry, and preheat oven to 375F. Toss in a baking dish with melted butter, pepper and scallions, as well as any fresh herbs like dill and basil that appeal to you and are in season. Set uncovered in the middle level of the oven for about an hour, tossing a few times, until tender, but with a suggestion of crispiness and texture. They will barely color during cooking.

Photos by Alicia Rose

INTERVIEW : NAOMI POMEROY OF BEAST - JULIA CHILD’S 100TH BIRTHDAY

At this point, neither Julia Child nor Naomi Pomeroy really need an introduction. Naomi’s Beast in Portland, Oregon, and the spectacular food she serves there, have catapulted her to a solid seat among culinary greats from every generation and culture. She is one of the most genuine, hard-working, creative, ambitious and inspiring people we know — a lot like Our Lady of the Ladle herself. On Julia’s 100th birthday, we were privileged to get a few words from Naomi (while prepping for tonight’s prix-fixe) about cucumbers, love and one of her icons.

Did Julia Child have an influence on you as a kid?

Totally. My mom sas raised in a Southern California household with a mom whose idea of dinner was unseasoned turkey and iceberg salad. In 1968, my mom moved to Corvallis to attend OSU. As an 18 year old, finally free from her mom’s weird ideas about food, my mother taught herself to cook. Much of this was achieved through her forays into Mastering the Art of French Cooking. By the time I was born my mom was an avid cook… Thanks Julia!! 

How did she bridge the feminized domestic arts with the male-dominated world of culinary arts?

Julia was always unapologetic. I like that. Dudes never apologize for their choices in the kitchen… She didn’t either — But she was soft, and full of heart. And that combo really made her (and her food) shine.

Julia’s romance with Paul Child seemed to be an enormous source of support and inspiration. How do partnerships fuel creativity and productiveness?

As people who cook for a living, we really need the support of people around us. We aren’t saving lives or anything… But sometimes our hours are similar to ER doctors! 

I don’t like to call chefs “artists” — but at the same time, we are vulnerable. We make things for people to consume right in front of us. That leaves us unshielded sometimes from what people think — and we are sensitive! I would guess for the majority of us, we really want to take care of people. It’s in our NATURE. So we sometimes take our little failures home with us… We need a listening ear when it comes to that. I recently got married, and my husband Kyle is great for this. I really love that I can talk about new ideas, or little issues, and he listens… Doesn’t advise really — just hears me. It really helps.

One thing about Julia Child is that she so clearly loved life. Do you think chefs are happier people?

I do think chefs are happier…usually. Sometimes we get too caught up in perfection and complexity though. I think that is why Julia makes such a great role model. She really showcased what is best about a GOOD chef. When something doesn’t go right, you just laugh, and turn to something else… It is a kitchen! We are COOKING and if we aren’t happy, we certainly SHOULD be. We are all so lucky to be doing what we love for work. 

What’s next for Beast? What should we stay tuned for?

I wait for the right opportunities — I don’t force things. Back in the Spring I thought I was going to move locations, but then a good agreement that was best for the business  couldn’t be reached… It’s OK. I always wait for what feels right.

I was just asked by Time magazine to cover a food-related trip for an upcoming piece that runs in September. I had a blast traveling in Corsica and studying the food there… Who knows? Travel writing or travel TV? Or a cookbook?? It’s all up in the air, but it’s all wonderful too.

Any recipes you want to share on this important day?

I say this — if you haven’t tried to sauté cucumbers…do! They are wonderful. I add some onion as well, and finish with a little squeeze of lemon juice or champagne vinegar and a tiny pinch of sugar… It’s like Julia’s, only a little adapted.

Peel or partially peel cucumbers, cut in half lengthwise and then into strips. Toss with vinegar, salt and sugar and let stand anywhere from thirty minutes to several hours. Drain and pat dry, and preheat oven to 375F. Toss in a baking dish with melted butter, pepper and scallions, as well as any fresh herbs like dill and basil that appeal to you and are in season. Set uncovered in the middle level of the oven for about an hour, tossing a few times, until tender, but with a suggestion of crispiness and texture. They will barely color during cooking.

Photos by Alicia Rose


INTERVIEW : CRAFT BREWERS SAM CALAGIONE & “DR.” BILL SYSAK
We love beer culture, so we’re bringing some of our brewer friends together for our first annual Craft Beer Weekend at Ace Hotel & Swim Club. The two-day celebration of microbrewers, hop heads, cask masters and malsters goes down August 3 and 4. You can get a bucket of craft beers and a bunch of other cool stuff with your room — call us and mention code BEER to book. And check out the beer menu — we’ll be posting a food pairing menu soon; for now we’re still obsessing over it with Bill Sysak…
We sat down with two godfathers of micro-brewing, “Dr.” Bill Sysak of Stone Brewing Co. and Sam Calagione, founder and president of Dogfish Head Brewery, to talk about what they do and the unique and radical culture of the craft brew industry.
Both of your sites have this really robust background about your brands. There aren’t a lot of major beer brands that care that much about the company culture also. It seems like both of you are part of this larger movement. How did you both get into brewing? What makes you feel so passionately about it? 
Sam : Stone Brewing Co. and Dogfish Head started around the same era in the mid-to-late 90s, and we’re kind of considered second generation breweries on the timeline of craft brewing. The industry is about thirty years young if you look at Sierra Nevada as the original start up craft brewery. The second-generation came around and had these awesome forefathers, but we decided to take another tact and brew very intensely flavorful, very personal beers designed to offend as many people as they are to excite. If a brewery like Dogfish or Stone makes twenty or thirty different beers, we know a person might hate four or five of them because they don’t calibrate well to that person’s palate, but we know they are probably going to fall in love with five or six of them too.
Dr. Bill : That first generation — they were coming off of macro-physiology. By the time we came around in the 90s, we were able to get as crazy as we wanted to be because there was already a palate set for basic beers, so people like Greg, our founder, and Sam are able to make these amazing beers that are so outside the normal bounds of possibility. Either you like it or you don’t, but definitely we get a lot of converts from doing that.

Bill, you’re a Certified Cicerone. Does that background come from outside or within brewing, and this particular culture and craft?
Dr. Bill : I was in a unique situation because my father got me into good, fresh beer when I was 15 — right at the time when the craft beer revolution was starting. I was kind of that first beer aficionado or beer geek. I built relationships with everybody as a civilian while I was working in the medical field because of my passion for beer. I became known as an expert in food pairing and cellaring beers, and always had a really good palate. When it was time for me to retire from the medical field, Greg jumped on the chance to have me come work for them and be their Cicerone — the equivalent of a wine sommelier. 
Sam, you bring an interesting background too because you actually have an English degree. You got into this when you were working at a bar that served microbrews, right?
Sam : Yes, in New York, not far from Ace Hotel actually. I fell in love with beer while working at a first-generation craft beer restaurant. The owner and I started home brewing in our kitchens and the hobby spun out of control. We opened Dogfish in ‘95. Our focus from day one was off-centered ales for off-centered people. We look at the entire culinary landscape for potential ingredients in our beer. If you look at the culinary world today and the locavore and artisanal movement, that’s what craft breweries have been doing since before it had a name. 

Just the fact that your passion is based around an intoxicant is probably a huge boost for the level of connectivity and creativity that’s possible around your work. It seems like when you’re out there promoting your products, connecting with your cohorts and your colleagues, everyone is drinking beer so everyone is happy…which is pretty cool. 
Sam : Exactly. We have a saying in this industry that the craft brewing community is 99% asshole free.
Dr. Bill : There’s a lot of comradery in craft brewing. We’re all riding the wave together. If somebody runs out of hops, they’re going to contact one of the other brewers to borrow some.

Do you feel that there is a larger value system among brewers that everyone wants to work toward together — a similar cultural or social aim? 
Dr. Bill : Definitely. One of the main goals is to get the gospel of craft beer spread out to all the people. There are 2,000 breweries in America today, but there’s still only a small percentage of people that have tasted craft beer and know what true flavor is all about. So it’s important to us to have a united front so that we can promote craft beer to the masses and give them the opportunity to decide for themselves.
Sam : I always say the craft beer drinker is blissfully promiscuous. So we all kind of band together. We know that if they are going to drink our beer, it’s because they are adventurous drinkers and we love that. It’s a pretty weird thing, and it really captivates the consumer because they see us working together in this very authentic, grassroots, natural way.

INTERVIEW : CRAFT BREWERS SAM CALAGIONE & “DR.” BILL SYSAK

We love beer culture, so we’re bringing some of our brewer friends together for our first annual Craft Beer Weekend at Ace Hotel & Swim Club. The two-day celebration of microbrewers, hop heads, cask masters and malsters goes down August 3 and 4. You can get a bucket of craft beers and a bunch of other cool stuff with your room — call us and mention code BEER to book. And check out the beer menu — we’ll be posting a food pairing menu soon; for now we’re still obsessing over it with Bill Sysak…

We sat down with two godfathers of micro-brewing, “Dr.” Bill Sysak of Stone Brewing Co. and Sam Calagione, founder and president of Dogfish Head Brewery, to talk about what they do and the unique and radical culture of the craft brew industry.

Both of your sites have this really robust background about your brands. There aren’t a lot of major beer brands that care that much about the company culture also. It seems like both of you are part of this larger movement. How did you both get into brewing? What makes you feel so passionately about it? 

Sam : Stone Brewing Co. and Dogfish Head started around the same era in the mid-to-late 90s, and we’re kind of considered second generation breweries on the timeline of craft brewing. The industry is about thirty years young if you look at Sierra Nevada as the original start up craft brewery. The second-generation came around and had these awesome forefathers, but we decided to take another tact and brew very intensely flavorful, very personal beers designed to offend as many people as they are to excite. If a brewery like Dogfish or Stone makes twenty or thirty different beers, we know a person might hate four or five of them because they don’t calibrate well to that person’s palate, but we know they are probably going to fall in love with five or six of them too.

Dr. Bill : That first generation — they were coming off of macro-physiology. By the time we came around in the 90s, we were able to get as crazy as we wanted to be because there was already a palate set for basic beers, so people like Greg, our founder, and Sam are able to make these amazing beers that are so outside the normal bounds of possibility. Either you like it or you don’t, but definitely we get a lot of converts from doing that.

Bill, you’re a Certified Cicerone. Does that background come from outside or within brewing, and this particular culture and craft?

Dr. Bill : I was in a unique situation because my father got me into good, fresh beer when I was 15 — right at the time when the craft beer revolution was starting. I was kind of that first beer aficionado or beer geek. I built relationships with everybody as a civilian while I was working in the medical field because of my passion for beer. I became known as an expert in food pairing and cellaring beers, and always had a really good palate. When it was time for me to retire from the medical field, Greg jumped on the chance to have me come work for them and be their Cicerone — the equivalent of a wine sommelier. 

Sam, you bring an interesting background too because you actually have an English degree. You got into this when you were working at a bar that served microbrews, right?

Sam : Yes, in New York, not far from Ace Hotel actually. I fell in love with beer while working at a first-generation craft beer restaurant. The owner and I started home brewing in our kitchens and the hobby spun out of control. We opened Dogfish in ‘95. Our focus from day one was off-centered ales for off-centered people. We look at the entire culinary landscape for potential ingredients in our beer. If you look at the culinary world today and the locavore and artisanal movement, that’s what craft breweries have been doing since before it had a name. 

Just the fact that your passion is based around an intoxicant is probably a huge boost for the level of connectivity and creativity that’s possible around your work. It seems like when you’re out there promoting your products, connecting with your cohorts and your colleagues, everyone is drinking beer so everyone is happy…which is pretty cool. 

Sam : Exactly. We have a saying in this industry that the craft brewing community is 99% asshole free.

Dr. Bill : There’s a lot of comradery in craft brewing. We’re all riding the wave together. If somebody runs out of hops, they’re going to contact one of the other brewers to borrow some.

Do you feel that there is a larger value system among brewers that everyone wants to work toward together — a similar cultural or social aim? 

Dr. Bill : Definitely. One of the main goals is to get the gospel of craft beer spread out to all the people. There are 2,000 breweries in America today, but there’s still only a small percentage of people that have tasted craft beer and know what true flavor is all about. So it’s important to us to have a united front so that we can promote craft beer to the masses and give them the opportunity to decide for themselves.

Sam : I always say the craft beer drinker is blissfully promiscuous. So we all kind of band together. We know that if they are going to drink our beer, it’s because they are adventurous drinkers and we love that. It’s a pretty weird thing, and it really captivates the consumer because they see us working together in this very authentic, grassroots, natural way.


INTERVIEW : GLORIA NOTO : WORK MAGAZINE

Work Magazine and Gloria Noto are national treasures. As art, fashion, design and music become increasingly co-opted by the world of corporate marketing, we need tastemakers and champions of the underground ever more with each passing season. Gloria — like the best of the best who have come before her — follows her instinct when curating exhilarating content for Work; she knows it when she sees it because she feels it. Work Magazine can now be found in rooms at Ace Hotel & Swim Club — leaving your room with one in the morning and reading it by the pool with a Bloody Mary and French Toast breakfast is highly recommended.

We wanted to ask Gloria about her background, her work and her daydreams. She obliged.

You grew up in Detroit. Being from the archetypical blue-collar American city must have something to do with the magazine’s proletarian name.

That is a very interesting angle. It very well could have been a part of the many ingredients that make up the basis of the title and concept of The Work Magazine. Growing up in Detroit gave me a fierce work ethic and follow through with the things I set out to accomplish. To be from Detroit means to be a fighter and a hard worker. It’s tough out there, so you have to be tough with it.  

What does the magazine as a blank canvas mean to you as people, artists, citizens?

Each time I launch an Issue, the very next day, I am faced with another blank canvas and all the hopes and dreams I would like to set to accomplish with the following issue. Having the magazine be such a great platform for myself to express and connect my feelings and interests to the world is such a great feeling for me…to connect…that’s all we really want to do itsn’t it? And then there is the greater purpose of The Work Magazine, to be a blank canvas for those involved. To help them push the limits to submit something of the issues concept, but submit something that forces them to think outside the box, or get out side of their comfort zone. And now take that one step higher, and reach the reader…having them hold that once blank canvas in their hands and shown something they haven’t seen in other magazines, or in general, and to teach them something new, to give them something new to store in a crinkle of their brain. Like before mentioned, to connect. That’s what a blank canvas means to me.

Does it feel like work?

A lot of people say that if you love what you do, it will never feel like work…I disagree! Yes it feels like work, because it is work. It takes a lot of time, a lot of back and forth and searching, a lot of bumps, etc. And when you are a very small family that mainly does this as a labor of love, it takes even more work. But with that said, the work is so gratifying, and such a learning experience with every individual I meet, or bump that I encounter, that it makes the work enjoyable at even it’s harder points. I am lucky to have a strong team that keeps things together for me when I feel like I am at my last, and a team that is constantly bringing new and interesting point of views to the table.  Without them, there would be a really sad magazine. So yes, it feels like work, but who says a work feeling can’t be a good feeling!?

What has inspired you in the last 24 hours or so?

My girlfriend Ally and the little pow-wow conversations we have while taking a very long walk around the SilverLake Reservoir. We get on topics of work often and have such a great banter on back and forth ideas on what we want to accomplish and how we can do these things. And then there was the neighborhood I was walking in while having this conversation, Silverlake is such an inspiring little town full of beautiful homes, nature,  artistic people, and amazing food… Every time I walk in my neighborhood I feel a dueling sense of peace and excitement. I can feel the creative energy all around me and that makes me feel creative in return.

If you were packing your bags and leaving LA today, where would you be moving to?

Are we talking realistically here? Because I would have to take into account where I could continue to work, if that was the case. But since I have a feeling that you don’t mean a realistic answer, I would say Berlin. I haven’t been yet, but I think it would work out.  

Why did The Work need to be?

The Work Magazine needed to be because I needed an outlet to be. I am a makeup artist as well, and am constantly surrounded by these amazing individuals whom I thought deserved recognition, rather than the same bull shit that I would see over and over again in magazines, used only because the client would be paying them for product placement rather than because the item or the concept had soul. I felt that a lot of soul was missing from publications and that I also wanted to leave a mark on the transitioning magazine world. I wanted to show the world what I thought was interesting and to hopefully have them share the same view, and in doing so, share these amazing artists with the world.

Do you have a favorite magazine on airplanes?

I don’t have a specific one, but I did grab the most recent issues of BUST, LOVE, GentleWoman, and Dosier, and a new favorite Kinfolk on my last flight to NYC. They helped me through the whole flight.  

If a fictional character was curating an issue of The Work, who would it be?

Someone with a severe case of schizophrenia, ADD, and great taste. Maybe Andy Warhol. 


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