Hashima Island, Japan
A few months ago, our friend and collaborator Andrew Meredith took a trip to the Hashima Island, on the Southwest coast of Japan. The island, a coal mining settlement established in the 1800s, was once the most densely inhabited place on earth. However, it had been completely deserted since the early 1970s, when the Government of Nagasaki decided to close the mine.
Even though people left, the buildings where they used to work and live, along with their belongings remained untouched and suspended in time as a testimony of a city that once was and shut down in a bat of an eye.
Through photography, Andrew Meredith was able to raise awareness on the existence of this hidden place, where none of us will probably ever go. Meredith’s intense and resonant photographs of the inanimate apartments, school, hospital and mine manage to express what it used to be on the Island and, in a way, give it a second life.
The full photo-report is viewable here.

Hashima Island, Japan

A few months ago, our friend and collaborator Andrew Meredith took a trip to the Hashima Island, on the Southwest coast of Japan.
The island, a coal mining settlement established in the 1800s, was once the most densely inhabited place on earth. However, it had been completely deserted since the early 1970s, when the Government of Nagasaki decided to close the mine.

Even though people left, the buildings where they used to work and live, along with their belongings remained untouched and suspended in time as a testimony of a city that once was and shut down in a bat of an eye.

Through photography, Andrew Meredith was able to raise awareness on the existence of this hidden place, where none of us will probably ever go. Meredith’s intense and resonant photographs of the inanimate apartments, school, hospital and mine manage to express what it used to be on the Island and, in a way, give it a second life.

The full photo-report is viewable here.


Train station stamps — mementos collected across a journey along Japan’s Yamanote Line Railway by PingMag.  

Train station stamps — mementos collected across a journey along Japan’s Yamanote Line Railway by PingMag.  







Delicate experiments in minimalism by anonymous Japanese art friends Rrrrrrrroll suggest a world in which we can pause on the beloved, Hogwarts-style, just long enough to truly see. Around which what central axis do we turn without knowing we do? Inquiries such as these create a mini-cinema like a song on repeat — the curve of the telephone, rough jaw of a boulder or smoke signal igniting the dormant, love-drenched neurons of hypnosis. In other words, we like these.

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Delicate experiments in minimalism by anonymous Japanese art friends Rrrrrrrroll suggest a world in which we can pause on the beloved, Hogwarts-style, just long enough to truly see. Around which what central axis do we turn without knowing we do? Inquiries such as these create a mini-cinema like a song on repeat — the curve of the telephone, rough jaw of a boulder or smoke signal igniting the dormant, love-drenched neurons of hypnosis. In other words, we like these.


RARE VINYL SERIES: ORIGAMI VINYL, DTLANeil Schield : The Jacks, Vacant World
About five years back I was trolling the internet for Japanese Rock and stumbled upon some outdated website documenting the lost sounds of Japanese Garage Rock from the 60’s. Many of the bands were influenced by the sounds of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys. The Jacks were Japan’s most interesting and creative answer to that sound. Their album “Vacant World” displayed the most awesome heavy fuzz sound that spun my head around. I’ve been rocking this album ever since. Sadly the thing is so rare, I haven’t been able to get my hands on a copy. You can get a fix of The Jacks here, and read more about their releases on Garage Hangover.
We’re featuring rare vinyl profiles by some of our favorite record labels and shops around the world. Keep an eye out for more.

RARE VINYL SERIES: ORIGAMI VINYL, DTLA
Neil Schield : The Jacks, Vacant World

About five years back I was trolling the internet for Japanese Rock and stumbled upon some outdated website documenting the lost sounds of Japanese Garage Rock from the 60’s. Many of the bands were influenced by the sounds of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys. The Jacks were Japan’s most interesting and creative answer to that sound. Their album “Vacant World” displayed the most awesome heavy fuzz sound that spun my head around. I’ve been rocking this album ever since. Sadly the thing is so rare, I haven’t been able to get my hands on a copy. You can get a fix of The Jacks here, and read more about their releases on Garage Hangover.

We’re featuring rare vinyl profiles by some of our favorite record labels and shops around the world. Keep an eye out for more.


Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi Ace Hotel Japanese Garden Portland


Today marks the two year anniversary of Japan’s Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, March 11, 2011. Areas hardest hit are still struggling to repair, rebuild and heal. Remember our human family in Japan and reach out to help. You can donate directly to The Real Medicine Foundation, or pick up a shirt by Kenzo Minami on our shop — 100% of proceeds go to support and relief efforts. Kenzo says this about the shirt’s message:
"It is about ‘Re:’ in terms of ‘Reply’ — our reply to the tsunami and our response to Japan (which is this charity itself and collectively to help the world and give on a larger scale). Also, Japan will need a lot of ‘Re____’ from now on: ‘Rebuild,’ ‘Restart,’ ‘Reboot,’ ‘Recharge’ and more."

Today marks the two year anniversary of Japan’s Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, March 11, 2011. Areas hardest hit are still struggling to repair, rebuild and heal. Remember our human family in Japan and reach out to help. You can donate directly to The Real Medicine Foundation, or pick up a shirt by Kenzo Minami on our shop — 100% of proceeds go to support and relief efforts. Kenzo says this about the shirt’s message:

"It is about ‘Re:’ in terms of ‘Reply’ — our reply to the tsunami and our response to Japan (which is this charity itself and collectively to help the world and give on a larger scale). Also, Japan will need a lot of ‘Re____’ from now on: ‘Rebuild,’ ‘Restart,’ ‘Reboot,’ ‘Recharge’ and more."


Our gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project Film “24 Hours at Ace” migrated from Ace Hotel New York to The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. 
The exhibit features works by friends of Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project including Andie Acosta, Chloe Aftel, Elijah Wood, Adam Goldberg, Nicole Held, Araks Yeramyan, Jeremy Kost, Anne Bowerman, Michael Nevin, Steve Olson, Dave Ortiz, Devon Turnbull, Pat Sansone and work captured by influencers in Japan curated by The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. 
If you’re lucky enough to be in the hood, it’s up until July 20. If you’re not, you can pick up some keepsake tees on our shop.







Photos by Akisome

Our gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project Film “24 Hours at Ace” migrated from Ace Hotel New York to The Impossible Project Space Tokyo.

The exhibit features works by friends of Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project including Andie Acosta, Chloe Aftel, Elijah Wood, Adam Goldberg, Nicole Held, Araks Yeramyan, Jeremy Kost, Anne Bowerman, Michael Nevin, Steve Olson, Dave Ortiz, Devon Turnbull, Pat Sansone and work captured by influencers in Japan curated by The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. 

If you’re lucky enough to be in the hood, it’s up until July 20. If you’re not, you can pick up some keepsake tees on our shop.

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Photos by Akisome


"24 Hours at Ace" — a gallery show of instant analog photography on Ace Hotel x Impossible Project film — migrates from Ace Hotel New York to The Impossible Project Space Tokyo, June 22-July 8, 2012. The exhibit features works by friends of Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project including Andie Acosta, Chloe Aftel, Elijah Wood, Adam Goldberg, Nicole Held, Araks Yeramyan, Jeremy Kost, Anne Bowerman, Michael Nevin, Steve Olson, Dave Ortiz, Devon Turnbull, Pat Sansone and work captured by influencers in Japan curated by The Impossible Project Space Tokyo. If you’re in the neighborhood, come see us.

We’ll present a follow-up gallery show at Ace Hotel New York in fall 2012 featuring photos submitted by fans of Ace and Impossible to our online gallery. Stay tuned.


Japan’s Casa Brutus and SPBS annex teamed up to open a pop-up shop at the SPBS annex store in Shibuya called “Hotel Casa BRUTUS” — open through May 6. The shop features the BEAMS x Ace Hotel's capsule collection, goods from Ace Hotel, Tango Aria in Kyoto, Tokinokumo-Guesthouse from Nagahama, Shiga.
If you’re in the neighborhood, stop in and see us.

Japan’s Casa Brutus and SPBS annex teamed up to open a pop-up shop at the SPBS annex store in Shibuya called “Hotel Casa BRUTUS” — open through May 6. The shop features the BEAMS x Ace Hotel's capsule collection, goods from Ace Hotel, Tango Aria in Kyoto, Tokinokumo-Guesthouse from Nagahama, Shiga.

If you’re in the neighborhood, stop in and see us.


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