London

Mr. X here talking about the meaning of self, tattooing, life and fatherhood. That minimal piano music you hear in the background is by Russ Chimes. Alex Nicholson makes the tattoos of Mr. X slowly melt into his skin throughout the film.  

Tattooing has been in important part of human cultures for over 5000 years. From the aristocracy in England to sea-farers the world over to indigenous peoples on most every continent, it’s been a way to distinguish and express ourselves. It’s nice to hear such a soft and connected voice speaking about how meaningful it is to commit to a piece of art for one’s life. Tattoos are the only artform that change with a person throughout their life, slowly blurring and melding with the skin.     

"I like the black ink in the skin. ‘Cos it’s not really black — it’s this funny bluish stuff. It’s India ink — it’s basically carbon. Which is what we’re made of." 


London, UK


Photos from Derek Ridgers' book 78-87 London Youth.

London, UK

Photos from Derek Ridgers' book 78-87 London Youth.


Shoreditch, London
It’s been almost four decades since NASA launched their twin Voyager probes — now the farthest manmade objects from Earth, at roughly 12 billion miles from our humble home. The vessels are famously home to a pair of Golden Records — one-sided LPs compiled with the help of Carl Sagan and others as audio time capsules of the human experience — each tossed like beautiful bottled messages into the black sea of space. 
Both probes are also home to instruments that transmit electromagnetic signals back to Earth — recording the unique “sounds” emitted from the celestial bodies they pass on their way through the void. Portland’s Lefse Records have tapped the well of NASA’s recordings, and invited folks like Spiritualized, Beach House and The Antlers to incorporate the otherworldly sounds into a set of new recordings. 
On April 15 at 7:30pm, our friends at creative science collective SUPER/COLLIDER present a listening party for THE SPACE PROJECT— the 7” box set coming out on Record Store Day that compiles the cosmic results. The listening party is preceded by a roundtable with The Quietus' Luke Turner, space scientist Professor Andrew Coates, astronomer Dr. Radmila Topolovic and astrostatistician Dr. Daniel Mortlock, discussing the Voyager missions and the lasting effects they've had on our relationship with the stars.

Shoreditch, London

It’s been almost four decades since NASA launched their twin Voyager probes — now the farthest manmade objects from Earth, at roughly 12 billion miles from our humble home. The vessels are famously home to a pair of Golden Records — one-sided LPs compiled with the help of Carl Sagan and others as audio time capsules of the human experience — each tossed like beautiful bottled messages into the black sea of space. 

Both probes are also home to instruments that transmit electromagnetic signals back to Earth — recording the unique “sounds” emitted from the celestial bodies they pass on their way through the void. Portland’s Lefse Records have tapped the well of NASA’s recordings, and invited folks like Spiritualized, Beach House and The Antlers to incorporate the otherworldly sounds into a set of new recordings. 

On April 15 at 7:30pm, our friends at creative science collective SUPER/COLLIDER present a listening party for THE SPACE PROJECT— the 7” box set coming out on Record Store Day that compiles the cosmic results. The listening party is preceded by a roundtable with The Quietus' Luke Turner, space scientist Professor Andrew Coates, astronomer Dr. Radmila Topolovic and astrostatistician Dr. Daniel Mortlock, discussing the Voyager missions and the lasting effects they've had on our relationship with the stars.


Shoreditch, London
Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi's been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.
Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.

Shoreditch, London

Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi's been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.

Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.


London, United Kingdom
Frank Stella’s “Black Series II" lithographs, Tate Collection.

London, United Kingdom

Frank Stella’s “Black Series II" lithographs, Tate Collection.


London, UK
Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.
The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia Kent, Paul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.

London, UK

Throughout the ’90s and early ’00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.

The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia KentPaul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.


Krefeld, Germany

Joseph Beuys wants to kill your to do list.

Works from the Tate Collection, London.


London, UK
Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London. Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.


London, UK
Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.

London, UK

Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.


London, UK
Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014. 
We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.
The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  
How and why did you start the blog? 
'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.
Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?
Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 
Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 
The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 
Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.

London, UK

Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014.

We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.

The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  

How and why did you start the blog? 

'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.

Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?

Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 

Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 

The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 

Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.


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