What is now reason was formerly impulse or instinct. -Ovid
For the rest of today, there are affordable flights from all over to Los Angeles and to New York. 

What is now reason was formerly impulse or instinct. -Ovid

For the rest of today, there are affordable flights from all over to Los Angeles and to New York. 


This Sunday, Domino Kirke will be spending some quiet time with us at Ace Hotel New York, performing an intimate set in our lobby. London-born and Brooklyn-based, Kirke’s delicate, spindling lullabies have roots in her circuitous history: born to Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke and interior designer Lorraine Kirke — a gene pool she shares with her sister Jemima — she spent the mid-oughts with DOMINO, the eponymous band she fronted until the birth of her son, Cass. With motherhood came a brief musical interlude in which she became a doula, a path that she took to with the same effortless aplomb as she did songwriting.
Her welcome return to music was recently kicked off with The Guard, a new EP produced with members of Lansing-Dreiden and Cibo Matto. We asked Domino to give us a glimpse into her creative process, and share her thoughts on some of the things inspiring her work right now. 

The best thing I ever bought on Etsy… By SecretHolidayCo,  the “It’s OK” banner, hung appropriately above my front door.

My crew, shot by Pamela Hanson for Wool and the Gang. One of my favorite photos of my son and boyfriend to date. Cassius is bitty here, but I love how woes he looks… the oldest soul I know.

When I’m not making music, I work as a Birth Doula. I co-founded a collective in Brooklyn called Carriage House Birth. My Mum found this at a flea market in Miami. It screamed “uterus” when I saw it, so I asked her if we could put in my office in Williamsburg, and it quickly became the center piece of the space. 

My sisters are a constant inspiration to me. Both hugely talented, and intensely beautiful, both inside and out. Here are some paintings my sister, Jemima, did of me and my littlest sister, Lola. The portrait of me was what I ended up using for the cover of my new EP, The Guard. I really felt she captured a new found inner calm that I like to think I acquired after becoming a mother. Hopefully that comes across in these new songs too.

This is my view of the blue ridge mountains from our bedroom porch in Afton, Virginia. I was always so humbled by them each morning. It wasn’t the best time to live there for us — we weren’t quite ready for the middle of nowhere. We came back to Brooklyn after a short while, but we both wrote some good songs, and really slowed down for a time, which was so invaluable for us. So, not for nothing… we’re making our way back there slowly. 

II by Unknown Mortal Orchestra is one of my favorite records in a long time.

This Sunday, Domino Kirke will be spending some quiet time with us at Ace Hotel New York, performing an intimate set in our lobby. London-born and Brooklyn-based, Kirke’s delicate, spindling lullabies have roots in her circuitous history: born to Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke and interior designer Lorraine Kirke — a gene pool she shares with her sister Jemima — she spent the mid-oughts with DOMINO, the eponymous band she fronted until the birth of her son, Cass.
With motherhood came a brief musical interlude in which she became a doula, a path that she took to with the same effortless aplomb as she did songwriting.

Her welcome return to music was recently kicked off with The Guard, a new EP produced with members of Lansing-Dreiden and Cibo Matto. We asked Domino to give us a glimpse into her creative process, and share her thoughts on some of the things inspiring her work right now. 

The best thing I ever bought on Etsy… By SecretHolidayCo,  the “It’s OK” banner, hung appropriately above my front door.

My crew, shot by Pamela Hanson for Wool and the Gang. One of my favorite photos of my son and boyfriend to date. Cassius is bitty here, but I love how woes he looks… the oldest soul I know.

When I’m not making music, I work as a Birth Doula. I co-founded a collective in Brooklyn called Carriage House Birth. My Mum found this at a flea market in Miami. It screamed “uterus” when I saw it, so I asked her if we could put in my office in Williamsburg, and it quickly became the center piece of the space. 

My sisters are a constant inspiration to me. Both hugely talented, and intensely beautiful, both inside and out. Here are some paintings my sister, Jemima, did of me and my littlest sister, Lola. The portrait of me was what I ended up using for the cover of my new EP, The Guard. I really felt she captured a new found inner calm that I like to think I acquired after becoming a mother. Hopefully that comes across in these new songs too.

This is my view of the blue ridge mountains from our bedroom porch in Afton, Virginia. I was always so humbled by them each morning. It wasn’t the best time to live there for us — we weren’t quite ready for the middle of nowhere. We came back to Brooklyn after a short while, but we both wrote some good songs, and really slowed down for a time, which was so invaluable for us. So, not for nothing… we’re making our way back there slowly. 

II by Unknown Mortal Orchestra is one of my favorite records in a long time.


We went to a preview of the Foundry Theater’s interpretation of Bertolt Brecht’s Good Person of Szechwan last night at the Public Theater at Astor Place in New York, and it BLEW OUR LITTLE MINDS. And it blew our hearts wide open. Taylor Mac is a lightening bolt, the set is painfully charming and the music is impeccable. And of course the (mixed) message tugs, tugs, tugs at the most distracting threads of what it means to be good. If you’re in town during its run, don’t miss it — the show ends November 24. You can get all the info you need for tickets here.



Photos by Carol Rosegg

We went to a preview of the Foundry Theater’s interpretation of Bertolt Brecht’s Good Person of Szechwan last night at the Public Theater at Astor Place in New York, and it BLEW OUR LITTLE MINDS. And it blew our hearts wide open. Taylor Mac is a lightening bolt, the set is painfully charming and the music is impeccable. And of course the (mixed) message tugs, tugs, tugs at the most distracting threads of what it means to be good. If you’re in town during its run, don’t miss it — the show ends November 24. You can get all the info you need for tickets here.

Photos by Carol Rosegg


Ace New Yorker Natalie Lomeli captured our imagination with her proposal for a mural in room 424 at the hotel — and this is what she created. You have the key to our hearts, Natalie.


Dumbo’s LAND Gallery opens a special exhibition at Ace Hotel New York October 3-28, celebrating art by adults with developmental disabilities. Here, a vertical triptych by Michael Pellew Jr.

Dumbo’s LAND Gallery opens a special exhibition at Ace Hotel New York October 3-28, celebrating art by adults with developmental disabilities. Here, a vertical triptych by Michael Pellew Jr.


NPR Music hosted 8 Million Stories: Hip Hop in 1993 at Ace Hotel New York with us in Liberty Hall last night. Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest, Uncle Ralph, Prince Paul, Mike Dean, Stretch, Faith and NPR’s own Frannie Kelley and Saidah Blount (re)presented and we all made beautiful music together.

NPR Music hosted 8 Million Stories: Hip Hop in 1993 at Ace Hotel New York with us in Liberty Hall last night. Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest, Uncle Ralph, Prince Paul, Mike Dean, Stretch, Faith and NPR’s own Frannie Kelley and Saidah Blount (re)presented and we all made beautiful music together.


On September 6 we celebrated New York Fashion Week with the launch of the i-D Magazine retrospective, now on display in our gallery space. The ongoing exhibit showcases a selection of iconic covers from the always surprising, continuously inspiring magazine.

Started as a London street-style fanzine in 1980 by former Vogue art director Terry Jones, i-D quickly became a staple in avant-garde culture by challenging the imaginative boundaries of its contributors, speaking to a burgeoning and ever-more-connected global creative culture without losing any of that daring, witty and spontaneous British spirit that we love so much. A veritable who’s-who of past and present kings of fashion, photography and art were catapulted into international recognition in the pages of the magazine — and the opportunity to wink at the world from the front cover of i-D has become a coveted badge of honor.
If you find yourself in The City over the next few days, swing by the exhibition and take a look (pun intended) at some of Terry Richardson, Ellen von Unwerth, Juergen Teller’s best cover portraits. It’s free and open 24/7 until September 27.

On September 6 we celebrated New York Fashion Week with the launch of the i-D Magazine retrospective, now on display in our gallery space. The ongoing exhibit showcases a selection of iconic covers from the always surprising, continuously inspiring magazine.

Started as a London street-style fanzine in 1980 by former Vogue art director Terry Jones, i-D quickly became a staple in avant-garde culture by challenging the imaginative boundaries of its contributors, speaking to a burgeoning and ever-more-connected global creative culture without losing any of that daring, witty and spontaneous British spirit that we love so much. A veritable who’s-who of past and present kings of fashion, photography and art were catapulted into international recognition in the pages of the magazine — and the opportunity to wink at the world from the front cover of i-D has become a coveted badge of honor.

If you find yourself in The City over the next few days, swing by the exhibition and take a look (pun intended) at some of Terry Richardson, Ellen von Unwerth, Juergen Teller’s best cover portraits. 
It’s free and open 24/7 until September 27.


This past April, NPR Music collaborated with us at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Coachella for two evenings taking turns at the decks with special guests The Embassy and a karaoke fight night. This month, they’re curating a well-read and winsome roster of selectors every Monday for Lobby Nights at Ace New York. So far, they’ve brought cohosts from shows like Microphone Check and Deceptive Cadence to play psych jams, hip-hop and far-fetched, deeply-researched noises in the lobby. Tonight, John, Eleanor and Josh of Ask Me Another are spinning what they humbly describe as “mega jams.”
Come by if you’re in the neighborhood for this penultimate friend of your brain. For the final evening next Monday, Microphone Check’s Ali and Frannie are back on the decks with NPR Music’s Events doyenne Saidah Blount. 

This past April, NPR Music collaborated with us at Ace Hotel & Swim Club during Coachella for two evenings taking turns at the decks with special guests The Embassy and a karaoke fight night. This month, they’re curating a well-read and winsome roster of selectors every Monday for Lobby Nights at Ace New York. So far, they’ve brought cohosts from shows like Microphone Check and Deceptive Cadence to play psych jams, hip-hop and far-fetched, deeply-researched noises in the lobby. Tonight, John, Eleanor and Josh of Ask Me Another are spinning what they humbly describe as “mega jams.”

Come by if you’re in the neighborhood for this penultimate friend of your brain. For the final evening next Monday, Microphone Check’s Ali and Frannie are back on the decks with NPR Music’s Events doyenne Saidah Blount. 


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INTERVIEW : JESSICA LAWRENCE

This commendable lady just biked across the nation from Portland, Oregon to the Atlantic Ocean this summer, with a brief stopover at Ace Hotel New York before she crossed the finish line. In a self-initiated tour de wellness supporting an active, grounded and playful lifestyle, Jessica has taught us so much. When she’s not riding the steel pony like a boss, she runs Cairn Guidance, consulting with public schools about health and wellness. Soon, Jessica will be celebrated by our friends at the Clinton Health Initiative and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation at the Healthy Schools Forum in Little Rock, in honor of the funds her adventure raised to fight childhood obesity.

We were really inspired by her journey and wanted to snag some photos of her in the photobooth and ask her a few questions, to which she obliged.

What was the moment at which this idea came to life and started germinating for you?

I was 15 years old and had just returned from a bicycle tour trip with other teens in Europe. I told my parents I would someday ride across the US. 23 years later, I fulfilled my dream.

When you first set rubber to road after your send-off breakfast, how massively free (and terrified) did you feel?

Three friends joined me for a few miles on their bikes from the Tin Shed Restaurant to the Springwater Corridor Trail. I remember my body was buzzing. Buzzing with excitement, independence and freedom. It was a gorgeous day. Once my friends left me, I remember looking ahead on the beautiful trail and thinking, “I’m doing this. I’m bicycling all the way across this country.” I felt more proud of myself in that moment than I ever have in my life.

Was there ever a moment where you wanted to give up? Who egged you on?

Of course there were challenging moments and days. My first challenge brought me snow in Montana (blog post entitled First Tears). My second challenge was in Kansas with thorns (6 flat tires in 2 days), 105 degree weather 4 days in a row and brutal head and side-winds. My third challenge was fatigue starting in the Appalachian Range for the last few weeks. These challenging days taught me to ask for help and reach out for support when I needed it. I might have been the one pedaling and carrying 80lbs of my own gear, but I never felt alone. Hundreds of people supported me, texted me, emailed me, posted about me, loved me, prayed for me, donated to my cause, fed me, hosted me, cheered me on and celebrated with me. A few people were there for me on a daily basis. My parents, Elin and Rick Lawrence, my personal trainer Aaron Sompson, at Kinetic Integration Manuel Therapy and Performance, Jamie Sparks, a colleague and close friend in Kentucky and Jamie Waltz, Alison Hansen and Ginny Ehrlich, all close friends. There was one day in particular I reached out to Aaron and cried. I was fatigued and didn’t know if I’d make it through the day. I rarely felt lonely as a result of all the people mentioned above.

Any revelations from the road?

Many. I would say my top three revelations include: 1. I’m so proud to be an American. I never want to take for granted how safe I felt as a female bicycling across this country (in spandex!) alone. We are fortunate that we live in such an amazing country with access to potable water and well-paved roads. Meeting Americans was the best part of the trip. People were unbelievably generous, inquisitive and supportive. 2. Laugh a lot. I loved the uncertainty of what my day would look like and where I would stay each night. It could be scary, stressful but also incredibly freeing. And, with that much alone time, you heal, process, reflect and laugh at yourself. Laughter played an important role on my trip. 3. My last revelation is the belief I can do anything I want. Doing something like this, as a solo female was the most empowering experience I’ve ever had. I’m incredibly proud of myself. Road to Rhode was a dream come true.


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