Look up.
The sky’s an untamable canvas. Otto Piene has been sending things heavenward for the better part of four decades — reimagining the wild blue yonder with inflatable “sky art” sculptures that each consider the lines between art and architecture, between the city and open space. 
His big ol’ balloons take to the sky like weightless intermediaries between us and the infinite — broad and big and reverent. 

Look up.

The sky’s an untamable canvas. Otto Piene has been sending things heavenward for the better part of four decades — reimagining the wild blue yonder with inflatable “sky art” sculptures that each consider the lines between art and architecture, between the city and open space. 

His big ol’ balloons take to the sky like weightless intermediaries between us and the infinite — broad and big and reverent. 


New York City
"People pay to see others believe in themselves."
We’re glad you were born into this world, Kim Gordon.

New York City

"People pay to see others believe in themselves."

We’re glad you were born into this world, Kim Gordon.


New York City, 1966

Frank O’Hara, “Having a Coke with You.” 


New York City
There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless. —Simone de Beauvoir.
Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.

New York City

There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless.
—Simone de Beauvoir.

Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.


New York City

Chris Tucci — illustrator, animator, universal charmer and hero behind our long standing Sunday Night Live music series in the lobby of Ace Hotel New York — recently finished this bewildering animation for Streets of Laredo. We can’t decide which part we like the most.


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


New York City

Last week wrapped up the final chapter in 24BY36, an ongoing experiment in art creation within the walls of Ace New York. For the project, 36 solo and duo artists spent the night with the purpose of producing 24 original works by morning. Love letters, collages, manifestos, musical partitions — we’ve been greatly amazed by the fruit of those twenty-four nights. The following snapshots are just an early glimpse into the collection of work and we’re already feeling inspired for the next edition.

image

NOWORK

image

FCKNLZ

image

ARIEL DILL

image

PATRICK HIGGINS

image

ADAM DUGAS + CASEY SPOONER


New York City
The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.
Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.

New York City

The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.

Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.


Why we love NY

Wireless network names found on a random Thursday, February 6 while driving down Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn at 9:45 pm:

dustball
Flower Bridge
HARDTIMES
partyhaireverywhere
infosuperhighway
Ham Sandwich
santilolo
Hand Written Guest
bacon
Bill Murray is a Fine Actor
scolding
Eye Love Ewe
Bigcat8240
Slipper Room Airport
suzydacutie
Brooklyn

Midtown, New York City

24 BY 36 is 36 artists producing 24 works overnight at Ace Hotel.
12 solo artists and 12 collaborative duos hotel-camping in New York.

We’ve invited a handful of artists to storm the castle, prompted with poems, scores, instructions, drawings, and scraps. We provide the room, the bottle of wine and the foundation-year-style Art Bin full of charcoal sticks and kneaded erasers. And then we get out of their way.

It kicked off last week with a collaborative effort by Sto and his invited accomplice Asha Man. The two laid down a tarp, made an altar, installed tons of small works around said altar, got nude, body-painted, evoked some spirits and in the end, made us a drawing. 

Tonight we’re posting up with JD Samson


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