New York City
"People pay to see others believe in themselves."
We’re glad you were born into this world, Kim Gordon.

New York City

"People pay to see others believe in themselves."

We’re glad you were born into this world, Kim Gordon.


New York City
Last month we hosted a little party for the literati in the town that gave us The New York School. Now we want to show you and tell you. 
At the invitation of Ace Hotel New York and Word Bookstore, over a dozen up-and-coming authors crafted short works in the second-person. Each story involves you, and a room. Below was the process for making these collaborative zines. 

You approach the grand study table at Ace Hotel on March 8 2014 and are handed a multi-sided die. Looking up, you notice 200 copies of 16 unique stories. Each page is 5.5” x 8.5”. The stacks are neat. Uniform. As instructed, you roll the die 8 times, each roll adding one work to your collection. You receive your final page. A friendly assistant hand stamps and staples it together. 

We had our turn rolling, adding, binding. If you missed out on the night, you can crib a downloadable PDF of ours here.

New York City

Last month we hosted a little party for the literati in the town that gave us The New York School. Now we want to show you and tell you. 

At the invitation of Ace Hotel New York and Word Bookstore, over a dozen up-and-coming authors crafted short works in the second-person. Each story involves you, and a room. Below was the process for making these collaborative zines. 

You approach the grand study table at Ace Hotel on March 8 2014 and are handed a multi-sided die. Looking up, you notice 200 copies of 16 unique stories. Each page is 5.5” x 8.5”. The stacks are neat. Uniform. As instructed, you roll the die 8 times, each roll adding one work to your collection. 

You receive your final page. A friendly assistant hand stamps and staples it together. 

We had our turn rolling, adding, binding. If you missed out on the night, you can crib a downloadable PDF of ours here.


Hear, hear.
It’s International Record Store Day, and we’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the things we see and hear, and the people we share it all with, profoundly shape our experience. We’re familiar with the pictorial record of the things that get our hearts pounding, the neighborhoods and buildings and people we fall in love with. But what of the everyday music, the ambient temporal and temporary audioscapes, the ephemeral pings and silences that punctuate every day? In celebration of the ineffable particulates that make up our love of place – the roots of our spots in Seattle, Portland, Palm Springs, New York and now LA, London and Panama – we’re tuning our antennae and putting our ear to the ground…
We enlisted the help of our friends Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck of Lucky Dragons to document the audible life of Downtown Los Angeles, and Aino Tytti to capture the uncageable energy of Shoreditch. Lucky Dragons create some of the most interesting sound experiences out there – engaging their physical surroundings, their audience and handmade electronic thingamajigs to create aural snapshots of time and place. Aino Tytti deconstructs and stitches back together the unique harmonies of the shared communal life of sidewalks and cities. In your hands, you hold the fruits of their labors. We also asked artists in every city where we hang our hat to create soundscapes that embody the spirit of each place (or a moment in the space-time continuum). You can read about these noise elves below.
So for now, take a listen. And then if you can, share what you hear when you walk out the door. Send us the early morning sounds of your walk to the train station or the bus stop, or your bike, or to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. Capture the high or the ebb tides of a city alive when you open your windows or walk down an out-of-way lane or stairway into the deep. Also, no one here will protest if you just send a 9 minute recording of your cat purring. We’ll put it all together at our little branch of the Sound Library and share alike.
Using the SoundCloud app on your phone, or any other app for that matter, record audio and then share it on any hashtag-friendly social platform using #acebroadcast and be sure to tag us as well: @acehotel​ on Twitter and Ace Hotel on Facebook. We’re listening, and it’s never too late to share. We’ll pick a few favorites and be in touch.
LUCKY DRAGONS : DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

Lucky Dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active as a band since 2000, they are known for their participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools.
Fischbeck and Rara have presented collaborative work in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, London’s Institute for Contemporary Art, The Kitchen in New York, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a fishing vessel that was caught in the fallout from h-bomb tests in the mid-1950′s, an incident which sparked international outcry and gave birth to the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.
luckydragons.orgacehotel.com/losangeles
AINO TYTTI : SHOREDITCH

Drawing from a palette of processed field recordings, home made synthesizers and distant vocals, Aino Tytti creates shimmering, ethereal drones; fusing interlocking spirals of static and warm distortion into widescreen harmonic backdrops and intricately layered micro structures.
Abandoning conventional tuning scales, sounds are recorded and deconstructed to reveal hidden accents and textures. The results are then layered and expanded using uniquely defined harmonic ratios, realised through custom made synthesizers and digital processing. Part decaying and arresting, part hypnotic yet cerebral, influences from experimentalists such as Popul Vuh, Arvo Part and Throbbing Gristle are smeared alongside contemporary futurists such as Alva Noto and William Basinski.
ainotytti.comacehotel.com/london
FARMER DAVE : PALM SPRINGS

Farmer Dave Scher is an artist from Southern California whose work encompasses music, sound design, DJing and visual art. In addition to his involvement with Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio and his self-titled work, Scher has worked as a producer and touring/session musician with Animal Collective, Elvis Costello, Interpol, Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice, Kurt Vile, Will Oldham, Vetiver and many others. 
A multi-instrumentalist, Scher is known for his textural steel guitar playing and creative use of waveform editing, deriving themes and inspiration from forms and patterns existing in Nature.  He has a particular love for the ocean and its creatures, and often emulates the sound and feel of the Sea with his music. In 2010, Scher launched his multipurpose sound design and composing enterprise Scher Sound, which offers a wide variety of audio-related creative services.
Scher is also the man behind Farmer Dave’s Hot Nuts, a habanero-roasted almond snack based on a family recipe. Mr. Scher lives and works in Venice, CA.
farmerdavescher.comacehotel.com/palmsprings
DIAMOND TERRIFIER : NOMAD DISTRICT, NYC

Diamond Terrifier is musician, DJ, artist, curator Sam Hillmer. Diamond Terrifier is Sam’s saxophone and electronics solo incarnation which sits at the intersection of ambient drone, world bass and sound system music, and the many great non-western saxophone traditions.
Sam Hillmer is the mind behind seminal Brooklyn noise band/chamber ensemble ZS, the You Are Here Festival (aka The Maze) which he conceives and produces with his visual art duo Trouble, and Representing NYC, the youth hip hop moniker that has released records for The Fly Girlz and Nine 11 Thesaurus on True Panther Sounds and The Social Registry respectively.
diamondterrifier.comacehotel.com/newyork
WORLD GANG : PDX + SEA


World Gang is a sound collaborative showcasing the work of Jeremiah Green and Darrin Wiener, two of the most enduring threads in the fabric of the Pacific Northwest’s music scene. Producer Darrin Wiener’s amalgam of synths and field recordings have shaped the sound of the Northwest’s IDM community since the turn of the century — the wizard behind the elegant curtains of Plastiq Phantom, DJs On Strike!, and the imputor? label, Wiener’s textural, humane approach to synthetic sounds has left an indelible stamp on the region’s overcast expanse. And the syncopated pulse of collaborator Jeremiah Green, best known as the unfaltering beat behind Modest Mouse, has been upsetting Cascadia’s rhythm for over 20 years. 
With an enviable résumé in film music, sound installation, and commercial work, World Gang has applied their nimble synthesis of organic sound and roiling electronics to a wide range of collaborative projects since 2006. 
music.world-gang.comacehotel.com/portlandacehotel.com/seattle
INGMAR HERRERA : PANAMA

Panamanian sound artist Ingmar Herrera presents an evocative street collage from busy avenues of Casco Viejo, near our latest portfolio project, American Trade Hotel.
acehotel.com/panama

Hear, hear.

It’s International Record Store Day, and we’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the things we see and hear, and the people we share it all with, profoundly shape our experience. We’re familiar with the pictorial record of the things that get our hearts pounding, the neighborhoods and buildings and people we fall in love with. But what of the everyday music, the ambient temporal and temporary audioscapes, the ephemeral pings and silences that punctuate every day? In celebration of the ineffable particulates that make up our love of place – the roots of our spots in Seattle, Portland, Palm Springs, New York and now LA, London and Panama – we’re tuning our antennae and putting our ear to the ground…

We enlisted the help of our friends Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck of Lucky Dragons to document the audible life of Downtown Los Angeles, and Aino Tytti to capture the uncageable energy of Shoreditch. Lucky Dragons create some of the most interesting sound experiences out there – engaging their physical surroundings, their audience and handmade electronic thingamajigs to create aural snapshots of time and place. Aino Tytti deconstructs and stitches back together the unique harmonies of the shared communal life of sidewalks and cities. In your hands, you hold the fruits of their labors. We also asked artists in every city where we hang our hat to create soundscapes that embody the spirit of each place (or a moment in the space-time continuum). You can read about these noise elves below.

So for now, take a listen. And then if you can, share what you hear when you walk out the door. Send us the early morning sounds of your walk to the train station or the bus stop, or your bike, or to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. Capture the high or the ebb tides of a city alive when you open your windows or walk down an out-of-way lane or stairway into the deep. Also, no one here will protest if you just send a 9 minute recording of your cat purring. We’ll put it all together at our little branch of the Sound Library and share alike.

Using the SoundCloud app on your phone, or any other app for that matter, record audio and then share it on any hashtag-friendly social platform using #acebroadcast and be sure to tag us as well: @acehotel on Twitter and Ace Hotel on Facebook. We’re listening, and it’s never too late to share. We’ll pick a few favorites and be in touch.


LUCKY DRAGONS : DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES


Lucky Dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active as a band since 2000, they are known for their participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools.

Fischbeck and Rara have presented collaborative work in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, London’s Institute for Contemporary Art, The Kitchen in New York, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a fishing vessel that was caught in the fallout from h-bomb tests in the mid-1950′s, an incident which sparked international outcry and gave birth to the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.

luckydragons.org
acehotel.com/losangeles


AINO TYTTI : SHOREDITCH

Drawing from a palette of processed field recordings, home made synthesizers and distant vocals, Aino Tytti creates shimmering, ethereal drones; fusing interlocking spirals of static and warm distortion into widescreen harmonic backdrops and intricately layered micro structures.

Abandoning conventional tuning scales, sounds are recorded and deconstructed to reveal hidden accents and textures. The results are then layered and expanded using uniquely defined harmonic ratios, realised through custom made synthesizers and digital processing. Part decaying and arresting, part hypnotic yet cerebral, influences from experimentalists such as Popul Vuh, Arvo Part and Throbbing Gristle are smeared alongside contemporary futurists such as Alva Noto and William Basinski.

ainotytti.com
acehotel.com/london


FARMER DAVE : PALM SPRINGS

Farmer Dave Scher is an artist from Southern California whose work encompasses music, sound design, DJing and visual art. In addition to his involvement with Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio and his self-titled work, Scher has worked as a producer and touring/session musician with Animal Collective, Elvis Costello, Interpol, Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice, Kurt Vile, Will Oldham, Vetiver and many others. 

A multi-instrumentalist, Scher is known for his textural steel guitar playing and creative use of waveform editing, deriving themes and inspiration from forms and patterns existing in Nature.  He has a particular love for the ocean and its creatures, and often emulates the sound and feel of the Sea with his music. In 2010, Scher launched his multipurpose sound design and composing enterprise Scher Sound, which offers a wide variety of audio-related creative services.

Scher is also the man behind Farmer Dave’s Hot Nuts, a habanero-roasted almond snack based on a family recipe. Mr. Scher lives and works in Venice, CA.

farmerdavescher.com
acehotel.com/palmsprings

DIAMOND TERRIFIER : NOMAD DISTRICT, NYC

Diamond Terrifier is musician, DJ, artist, curator Sam Hillmer. Diamond Terrifier is Sam’s saxophone and electronics solo incarnation which sits at the intersection of ambient drone, world bass and sound system music, and the many great non-western saxophone traditions.

Sam Hillmer is the mind behind seminal Brooklyn noise band/chamber ensemble ZS, the You Are Here Festival (aka The Maze) which he conceives and produces with his visual art duo Trouble, and Representing NYC, the youth hip hop moniker that has released records for The Fly Girlz and Nine 11 Thesaurus on True Panther Sounds and The Social Registry respectively.

diamondterrifier.com
acehotel.com/newyork

WORLD GANG : PDX + SEA

World Gang is a sound collaborative showcasing the work of Jeremiah Green and Darrin Wiener, two of the most enduring threads in the fabric of the Pacific Northwest’s music scene. Producer Darrin Wiener’s amalgam of synths and field recordings have shaped the sound of the Northwest’s IDM community since the turn of the century — the wizard behind the elegant curtains of Plastiq Phantom, DJs On Strike!, and the imputor? label, Wiener’s textural, humane approach to synthetic sounds has left an indelible stamp on the region’s overcast expanse. And the syncopated pulse of collaborator Jeremiah Green, best known as the unfaltering beat behind Modest Mouse, has been upsetting Cascadia’s rhythm for over 20 years. 

With an enviable résumé in film music, sound installation, and commercial work, World Gang has applied their nimble synthesis of organic sound and roiling electronics to a wide range of collaborative projects since 2006. 

music.world-gang.com
acehotel.com/portland
acehotel.com/seattle

INGMAR HERRERA : PANAMA

Panamanian sound artist Ingmar Herrera presents an evocative street collage from busy avenues of Casco Viejo, near our latest portfolio project, American Trade Hotel.

acehotel.com/panama


New York City

Man Forever is Kid Millions is John Colpitts — a founding member of Oneida, touring member of Spiritualized and one of the most omnipresent percussive forces in NYC. Under the Man Forever handle, Kid crafts intricate walls of pure percussion — long, rhythmic explorations that swell and pulse in a well-crafted cacophony. 

Man Forever’s new record Ryonen — recorded with contemporary classical ensemble So Percussion — drops today on Thrill Jockey, and he’s passed along this video to give us a brief glimpse into some of his more, well, challenging explorations. We’ll be celebrating the new record every Tuesday this month, with Man Forever-related friends and family spinning records in the lobby at Ace Hotel New York.

Our friends at Ad Hoc stopped by a couple weeks ago, sitting down to discuss the new record with Kid Millions and So Percussion — you can take a look at the interview over at their site

Man Forever dominates the eastern half of these United States from now through the end of June.


New York City, 1966

Frank O’Hara, “Having a Coke with You.” 


New York City
There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless. —Simone de Beauvoir.
Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.

New York City

There is something in the New York air that makes sleep useless.
—Simone de Beauvoir.

Broadway this past summer, in the eyes of photographer Patrick Romieu.


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New York City

During a brief break between the snow and cold of this brutal NY winter, Brooklyn based painter Rostarr braved a scant, sketchy scissor lift to adorn the recently installed scaffolding around Ace Hotel New York. 

My name is Romon Yang also know as Rostarr, I am a painter & calligrapher and I live and work in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. I was born in South Korea and moved with my family to Washington D.C. in 1972, I arrived in New York City in 1989 to attend the School of Visual Arts and have called NY home ever since.

Standing outside the whole day watching you paint the mural was pretty great. People crowded around and asked a lot of questions about you, who you are, where you’re from, but the number one question was, “is it some ancient Arabic script?” Tell us about the forms, your inspirations, how this style came about.

My approach to calligraphy is abstract & gestural, similar to asemic writing, and often times iconographic and pictogram like. As a young boy up until art school where I studied Typography and Iconography design, I’ve always appreciated the beauty and forms of calligraphy from China, Korea, Tibet, Thailand and Arabic calligraphic masters, and similarly my appreciation of hand styles by graffiti writers such as Phase II, Rammellzee, Futura, Keith Haring, etc., it was a natural transition for me to go from abstract painting to abstract calligraphy and vice versa. I will forever be a student of the brush & pen.    

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Everyone was amazed at how quickly you worked, you did half of the scaffolding in one day. You don’t appear to make mistakes either, it’s crazy. You’re clearly a pro at this, how long have you been doing this kind of work, these kinds of murals? 

Yeah, it’s a bit crazy to think that I painted a 4 foot high x 350 foot wide mural in 2 days (to be exact 10 hours, but who’s counting). I’ve been very fortunate to have been invited to make murals and large installations of various types, indoors/outdoors since 1998, around the time I joined the NY art collective Barnstormers. Making public art is giving love, plain and simple.

What inspires you, excites you, puts you your totally chill and creative zone?

I find the most pleasure in the moment of painting where I get in the zone and start laying my lines and shapes down, almost like building a visual sculpture. I get inspired by visualizing a location or wall and its surroundings and try to solve the problem with what style will make the right impact. 

With this painting commission for Ace Hotel, speed was an important factor as I wanted this mural to convey the energy and flow of commuters passing by 29th street & Broadway, similar to the way a computer motherboard looks with routes, destinations and intersections.

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Seems like one of the benefits to being a successful artist such as yourself, is that you get to do some traveling. Where’s you’re favorite place you’ve travelled to and what made it special?

I feel so lucky to have travelled a lot for my art, some of my favorite places have been: Tokyo, Paris, London, Venice, L.A., Mexico, Puerto Rico and especially Seoul Korea. Being that I left Korea when I was just 1 years old, Seoul holds a special place in my heart and is a place that I’m so curious about getting to know better, in a short amount of time I’ve met so many talented individuals and good friends out there, Seoul is definitely the place to watch out for!

As with any scaffolding in NYC, Rostarr’s work could be up for 3 months or 2 years. We recommend checking it out soon if you don’t want to miss it: 29th & B’way.

Photos by Lauren Coleman. 


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


New York City

Last week wrapped up the final chapter in 24BY36, an ongoing experiment in art creation within the walls of Ace New York. For the project, 36 solo and duo artists spent the night with the purpose of producing 24 original works by morning. Love letters, collages, manifestos, musical partitions — we’ve been greatly amazed by the fruit of those twenty-four nights. The following snapshots are just an early glimpse into the collection of work and we’re already feeling inspired for the next edition.

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NOWORK

image

FCKNLZ

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ARIEL DILL

image

PATRICK HIGGINS

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ADAM DUGAS + CASEY SPOONER


New York City
The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.
Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.

New York City

The respective works of composer Lesley Flanigan and indie group People Get Ready each approach music as a fundamentally physical act.

Flanigan’s ghostly, undulating electronic compositions are played on her own handcrafted instruments — comprised of minimal electronics, microphones, speakers and tons of feedback — whose bellowing reverberations rely on the clear physicality of human interaction. People Get Ready — a band lead by choreographer Steven Reker — delicately blur the line between pop show and performance piece, with a cleverly constructed hybrid of music and movement. 

Lesley and Steven came together a couple of weeks ago at Ace Hotel New York to participate in our 36BY24 residency project — more on that soon — to prepare for an incredible collaborative show that’s happening tomorrow, February 19 at Kaufman Music Center as part of the Ecstatic Music Festival.


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