Portland, OR
Tobacco, whiskey, cedar, pine, black pepper. Heather Sielaff’s Olo started in a closet, finds its ingredients in earth and smells like heaven. Ask a sweet-smelling thing on either side of the street in Portland what they’re wearing and the answer’s inevitably “Victory Wolf,” or just “Olo.”
Now Olo’s fragrance laboratory has an IRL home opening this weekend in Southeast Portland. It’s called Milk Milk Lemonade. Heather and Jonathan Sielaff are in the back, blending up bottles of god’s gift to nostrils. The front’s sparse and simple, with complimentary tea service to the side, and Olo’s whole habit-forming line front and center — all bookended by specially curated treats from Dream Collective, Rill Rill, Hazel Cox, Erica Weiner, No. Studio, Morihata and more. 
They’re opening house tomorrow, with occasional hours through the summer, and regular hours starting September.

Portland, OR

Tobacco, whiskey, cedar, pine, black pepper. Heather Sielaff’s Olo started in a closet, finds its ingredients in earth and smells like heaven. Ask a sweet-smelling thing on either side of the street in Portland what they’re wearing and the answer’s inevitably “Victory Wolf,” or just “Olo.”

Now Olo’s fragrance laboratory has an IRL home opening this weekend in Southeast Portland. It’s called Milk Milk Lemonade. Heather and Jonathan Sielaff are in the back, blending up bottles of god’s gift to nostrils. The front’s sparse and simple, with complimentary tea service to the side, and Olo’s whole habit-forming line front and center — all bookended by specially curated treats from Dream CollectiveRill Rill, Hazel Cox, Erica WeinerNo. Studio, Morihata and more. 

They’re opening house tomorrow, with occasional hours through the summer, and regular hours starting September.


Portland, OR
Portland’s annual Quiet Music Festival, Chris Johanson’s sleepy little lamb of a program, rears its downy head once again this weekend at Disjecta.
"We’ve got an even softer floor this year so we anticipate more sleeping," says Chris. "This is a great place to come if you’ve ever wanted to sleep with a group of people.”
This year’s list of light-hitters includes Marisa Anderson, American Music Club’s Mark Eitzel, Neal Morgan in a collaborative set with Pulse Emitter, The Mekons’ Sally Timms and many more. Let ‘em lull you.

Portland, OR

Portland’s annual Quiet Music Festival, Chris Johanson’s sleepy little lamb of a program, rears its downy head once again this weekend at Disjecta.

"We’ve got an even softer floor this year so we anticipate more sleeping," says Chris. "This is a great place to come if you’ve ever wanted to sleep with a group of people.”

This year’s list of light-hitters includes Marisa Anderson, American Music Club’s Mark EitzelNeal Morgan in a collaborative set with Pulse Emitter, The Mekons’ Sally Timms and many more. Let ‘em lull you.


Portland + Los Angeles
The American poet Norman Dubie says that what gives poetry so much freedom is that no one gets rich off writing it. Passion, and expressive language, drive poems into the world. 
Poetry is unique among artforms because it uses as its medium the building blocks of all communication, and, more or less, the building blocks of thought: language. Poetry uses language to communicate something that is beyond language, which is weird and causes things to be at once both what they are and so very much more than they are. 
At its most minimal, language speaks to us on two levels: it communicates raw info and it communicates contextual feelings and directions about that info. In the 1960s and ’70s, Aram Saroyan was mining this linguistic landscape to much notoriety — and infamy. His poem, “lighght,” exploded the idea of what a poem even is. 
And as the tattoo here illuminates, it’s still exploding ideas right down to the skin. This left hand belongs to another poet, Zachary Schomburg, who writes notes on his hands when he’s not collaborating and touring with musicians and filmmakers and making the sincerest surrealist books since sliced pages.

Portland Los Angeles

The American poet Norman Dubie says that what gives poetry so much freedom is that no one gets rich off writing it. Passion, and expressive language, drive poems into the world. 

Poetry is unique among artforms because it uses as its medium the building blocks of all communication, and, more or less, the building blocks of thought: language. Poetry uses language to communicate something that is beyond language, which is weird and causes things to be at once both what they are and so very much more than they are. 

At its most minimal, language speaks to us on two levels: it communicates raw info and it communicates contextual feelings and directions about that info. In the 1960s and ’70s, Aram Saroyan was mining this linguistic landscape to much notoriety — and infamy. His poem, “lighght,” exploded the idea of what a poem even is. 

And as the tattoo here illuminates, it’s still exploding ideas right down to the skin. This left hand belongs to another poet, Zachary Schomburg, who writes notes on his hands when he’s not collaborating and touring with musicians and filmmakers and making the sincerest surrealist books since sliced pages.


Portland, OR
John Jay is everywhere, like a feeling, or like air, and he might have even invented #hashtags. More important: he’s a good friend and move-buster and a mind with that hair-trigger twitch to engage culture in all its shapeshifting splendor.
Leading up to his talk at Semi-Permanent he spoke with Marketing Magazine about creativity and culture and his relationship with our dear, dear departed Alex. 

Photo by Matthew Furman

Portland, OR

John Jay is everywhere, like a feeling, or like air, and he might have even invented #hashtags. More important: he’s a good friend and move-buster and a mind with that hair-trigger twitch to engage culture in all its shapeshifting splendor.

Leading up to his talk at Semi-Permanent he spoke with Marketing Magazine about creativity and culture and his relationship with our dear, dear departed Alex. 

Photo by Matthew Furman


Portland, OR
Dilettante’s not a word you’d normally conjure up to compliment. But there’s something in Stephanie Simek's restless digressions that makes the idea of artful inexperience seem kind of revolutionary. Her muse sends her headlong into arcane and circuitous studies of natural science — flirting with botany, circuitry, crystallography, electro-magnetics, phosphorescent algae husbandry — self-sufficient sojourns into worlds wading just deep enough for her exquisite purposes.

"Radio Room," a functional, gallery-sized crystal radio composed of copper, fool’s gold, steel and paper. 
Her work’s got a wide breadth — spread out across sound art, conceptual fine art, a fantastical jewelry line and most recently her own line of fragrances. She’s made circuitry triggered by the behavior of venus flytraps, quail eggs lined with gold, a room-sized radio made from copper and crystals, a strangely well-publicized eyelash necklace made from human hair and countless other curios. In everything, Stephanie’s tactile creations share a common curiosity with the wonders of the natural world — an imaginative distillation of scientific complexities into their most elemental forms. 

Necklace sculpted from the Mitsumata branch, traditionally used in Japanese papermaking. 
Stephanie’s latest departure is a forthcoming third installment of her fragrance line — her selenite fragrance. Made from plant-based essential oils, it evokes soft florals with mandarin and vanilla notes and is housed inside a unique selenite crystal, complete with silver spray top with cap.

The reception for her latest installation — “Sounds in 6 Cities" — happens tonight in Portland at PSU’s Littman Gallery, running now through May 28.

Portrait by Isao Nishiyama.

Portland, OR

Dilettante’s not a word you’d normally conjure up to compliment. But there’s something in Stephanie Simek's restless digressions that makes the idea of artful inexperience seem kind of revolutionary. Her muse sends her headlong into arcane and circuitous studies of natural science — flirting with botany, circuitry, crystallography, electro-magnetics, phosphorescent algae husbandry — self-sufficient sojourns into worlds wading just deep enough for her exquisite purposes.

"Radio Room," a functional, gallery-sized crystal radio composed of copper, fool’s gold, steel and paper. 

Her work’s got a wide breadth — spread out across sound art, conceptual fine art, a fantastical jewelry line and most recently her own line of fragrances. She’s made circuitry triggered by the behavior of venus flytraps, quail eggs lined with gold, a room-sized radio made from copper and crystals, a strangely well-publicized eyelash necklace made from human hair and countless other curios. In everything, Stephanie’s tactile creations share a common curiosity with the wonders of the natural world — an imaginative distillation of scientific complexities into their most elemental forms. 

Necklace sculpted from the Mitsumata branch, traditionally used in Japanese papermaking. 

Stephanie’s latest departure is a forthcoming third installment of her fragrance line — her selenite fragranceMade from plant-based essential oils, it evokes soft florals with mandarin and vanilla notes and is housed inside a unique selenite crystal, complete with silver spray top with cap.

The reception for her latest installation — “Sounds in 6 Cities" — happens tonight in Portland at PSU’s Littman Gallery, running now through May 28.
Portrait by Isao Nishiyama.

Portland, OR and New York City
Today we’re celebrating along with all the Portlanders who eat food. We’re celebrating with all the New Yorkers who eat food, too. The James Beard Foundation’s Awards were just announced, and two of our favorite chefs in the wide world got the nod in two of the very best places to eat in our fine United States. 
April Bloomfield, holder of Michelin stars at count them two fine eateries in The Big Apple — including The Breslin, in our very own Ace Apple Outpost — champion of pigs both spotted and un- and person who straight up makes things happen. If you’ve been put through your paces in the restaurant world, you know Chef Bloomfield is as hardcore as they come.
Naomi Pomeroy, the fabulous and talented, the brains and brawn behind Beast and a badass mother to boot, just took home the 2014 James Beard Best Chef Northwest award. In her acceptance speech in New York City she said, "I feel like I’m taking this home for everybody in the Northwest." Bring it on home, you two. We’ll be here, ready. We’re the ones making all the glass-clinking noises. 

Portland, OR and New York City

Today we’re celebrating along with all the Portlanders who eat food. We’re celebrating with all the New Yorkers who eat food, too. The James Beard Foundation’s Awards were just announced, and two of our favorite chefs in the wide world got the nod in two of the very best places to eat in our fine United States. 

April Bloomfield, holder of Michelin stars at count them two fine eateries in The Big Apple — including The Breslin, in our very own Ace Apple Outpost — champion of pigs both spotted and un- and person who straight up makes things happen. If you’ve been put through your paces in the restaurant world, you know Chef Bloomfield is as hardcore as they come.

Naomi Pomeroy, the fabulous and talented, the brains and brawn behind Beast and a badass mother to boot, just took home the 2014 James Beard Best Chef Northwest award. In her acceptance speech in New York City she said, "I feel like I’m taking this home for everybody in the Northwest." Bring it on home, you two. We’ll be here, ready. We’re the ones making all the glass-clinking noises. 


Portland, OR
It arrived in hundreds of small cardboard boxes, each carefully catalogued and classified — butterfly-pinned pieces of untreated filth and detritus collected from the gutters of New York City. Yuji Agematsu’s thirty-plus year practice is as simple as it is incomprehensible: thousands of small pieces of trash amassed and displayed in maximalist, unadulterated formulations. It’s breathtakingly, disgustingly beautiful. 

Agematsu first large-scale, institutional show is coming to Portland this weekend thanks to Yale Union — the high-minded, occasionally inscrutable arts center that’s challenged and confounded Portland’s arts community for the better part of five years.

Built at the turn of the century as an industrial laundry, the imposing, two-story brick facade takes up over half a city block in Southeast Portland — enclosing a sprawling, well-windowed interior that emanates a kind of God-light during daylight hours. The building’s been transformed under the command of a tight-knit, visionary cooperative into something strange and special — a bold, internationally recognized contemporary art institution that’s unlike anything else in the city. It’s an uncompromisingly rough treasure, and a perfect partner for Agematsu’s heady works. 
The show opens April 26 and runs through June 29.

Portland, OR

It arrived in hundreds of small cardboard boxes, each carefully catalogued and classified — butterfly-pinned pieces of untreated filth and detritus collected from the gutters of New York City. Yuji Agematsu’s thirty-plus year practice is as simple as it is incomprehensible: thousands of small pieces of trash amassed and displayed in maximalist, unadulterated formulations. It’s breathtakingly, disgustingly beautiful. 

Agematsu first large-scale, institutional show is coming to Portland this weekend thanks to Yale Union — the high-minded, occasionally inscrutable arts center that’s challenged and confounded Portland’s arts community for the better part of five years.

Built at the turn of the century as an industrial laundry, the imposing, two-story brick facade takes up over half a city block in Southeast Portland — enclosing a sprawling, well-windowed interior that emanates a kind of God-light during daylight hours. The building’s been transformed under the command of a tight-knit, visionary cooperative into something strange and special — a bold, internationally recognized contemporary art institution that’s unlike anything else in the city. It’s an uncompromisingly rough treasure, and a perfect partner for Agematsu’s heady works.

The show opens April 26 and runs through June 29.


Hear, hear.
It’s International Record Store Day, and we’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the things we see and hear, and the people we share it all with, profoundly shape our experience. We’re familiar with the pictorial record of the things that get our hearts pounding, the neighborhoods and buildings and people we fall in love with. But what of the everyday music, the ambient temporal and temporary audioscapes, the ephemeral pings and silences that punctuate every day? In celebration of the ineffable particulates that make up our love of place – the roots of our spots in Seattle, Portland, Palm Springs, New York and now LA, London and Panama – we’re tuning our antennae and putting our ear to the ground…
We enlisted the help of our friends Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck of Lucky Dragons to document the audible life of Downtown Los Angeles, and Aino Tytti to capture the uncageable energy of Shoreditch. Lucky Dragons create some of the most interesting sound experiences out there – engaging their physical surroundings, their audience and handmade electronic thingamajigs to create aural snapshots of time and place. Aino Tytti deconstructs and stitches back together the unique harmonies of the shared communal life of sidewalks and cities. In your hands, you hold the fruits of their labors. We also asked artists in every city where we hang our hat to create soundscapes that embody the spirit of each place (or a moment in the space-time continuum). You can read about these noise elves below.
So for now, take a listen. And then if you can, share what you hear when you walk out the door. Send us the early morning sounds of your walk to the train station or the bus stop, or your bike, or to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. Capture the high or the ebb tides of a city alive when you open your windows or walk down an out-of-way lane or stairway into the deep. Also, no one here will protest if you just send a 9 minute recording of your cat purring. We’ll put it all together at our little branch of the Sound Library and share alike.
Using the SoundCloud app on your phone, or any other app for that matter, record audio and then share it on any hashtag-friendly social platform using #acebroadcast and be sure to tag us as well: @acehotel​ on Twitter and Ace Hotel on Facebook. We’re listening, and it’s never too late to share. We’ll pick a few favorites and be in touch.
LUCKY DRAGONS : DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

Lucky Dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active as a band since 2000, they are known for their participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools.
Fischbeck and Rara have presented collaborative work in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, London’s Institute for Contemporary Art, The Kitchen in New York, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a fishing vessel that was caught in the fallout from h-bomb tests in the mid-1950′s, an incident which sparked international outcry and gave birth to the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.
luckydragons.orgacehotel.com/losangeles
AINO TYTTI : SHOREDITCH

Drawing from a palette of processed field recordings, home made synthesizers and distant vocals, Aino Tytti creates shimmering, ethereal drones; fusing interlocking spirals of static and warm distortion into widescreen harmonic backdrops and intricately layered micro structures.
Abandoning conventional tuning scales, sounds are recorded and deconstructed to reveal hidden accents and textures. The results are then layered and expanded using uniquely defined harmonic ratios, realised through custom made synthesizers and digital processing. Part decaying and arresting, part hypnotic yet cerebral, influences from experimentalists such as Popul Vuh, Arvo Part and Throbbing Gristle are smeared alongside contemporary futurists such as Alva Noto and William Basinski.
ainotytti.comacehotel.com/london
FARMER DAVE : PALM SPRINGS

Farmer Dave Scher is an artist from Southern California whose work encompasses music, sound design, DJing and visual art. In addition to his involvement with Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio and his self-titled work, Scher has worked as a producer and touring/session musician with Animal Collective, Elvis Costello, Interpol, Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice, Kurt Vile, Will Oldham, Vetiver and many others. 
A multi-instrumentalist, Scher is known for his textural steel guitar playing and creative use of waveform editing, deriving themes and inspiration from forms and patterns existing in Nature.  He has a particular love for the ocean and its creatures, and often emulates the sound and feel of the Sea with his music. In 2010, Scher launched his multipurpose sound design and composing enterprise Scher Sound, which offers a wide variety of audio-related creative services.
Scher is also the man behind Farmer Dave’s Hot Nuts, a habanero-roasted almond snack based on a family recipe. Mr. Scher lives and works in Venice, CA.
farmerdavescher.comacehotel.com/palmsprings
DIAMOND TERRIFIER : NOMAD DISTRICT, NYC

Diamond Terrifier is musician, DJ, artist, curator Sam Hillmer. Diamond Terrifier is Sam’s saxophone and electronics solo incarnation which sits at the intersection of ambient drone, world bass and sound system music, and the many great non-western saxophone traditions.
Sam Hillmer is the mind behind seminal Brooklyn noise band/chamber ensemble ZS, the You Are Here Festival (aka The Maze) which he conceives and produces with his visual art duo Trouble, and Representing NYC, the youth hip hop moniker that has released records for The Fly Girlz and Nine 11 Thesaurus on True Panther Sounds and The Social Registry respectively.
diamondterrifier.comacehotel.com/newyork
WORLD GANG : PDX + SEA


World Gang is a sound collaborative showcasing the work of Jeremiah Green and Darrin Wiener, two of the most enduring threads in the fabric of the Pacific Northwest’s music scene. Producer Darrin Wiener’s amalgam of synths and field recordings have shaped the sound of the Northwest’s IDM community since the turn of the century — the wizard behind the elegant curtains of Plastiq Phantom, DJs On Strike!, and the imputor? label, Wiener’s textural, humane approach to synthetic sounds has left an indelible stamp on the region’s overcast expanse. And the syncopated pulse of collaborator Jeremiah Green, best known as the unfaltering beat behind Modest Mouse, has been upsetting Cascadia’s rhythm for over 20 years. 
With an enviable résumé in film music, sound installation, and commercial work, World Gang has applied their nimble synthesis of organic sound and roiling electronics to a wide range of collaborative projects since 2006. 
music.world-gang.comacehotel.com/portlandacehotel.com/seattle
INGMAR HERRERA : PANAMA

Panamanian sound artist Ingmar Herrera presents an evocative street collage from busy avenues of Casco Viejo, near our latest portfolio project, American Trade Hotel.
acehotel.com/panama

Hear, hear.

It’s International Record Store Day, and we’ve been thinking a lot lately about how the things we see and hear, and the people we share it all with, profoundly shape our experience. We’re familiar with the pictorial record of the things that get our hearts pounding, the neighborhoods and buildings and people we fall in love with. But what of the everyday music, the ambient temporal and temporary audioscapes, the ephemeral pings and silences that punctuate every day? In celebration of the ineffable particulates that make up our love of place – the roots of our spots in Seattle, Portland, Palm Springs, New York and now LA, London and Panama – we’re tuning our antennae and putting our ear to the ground…

We enlisted the help of our friends Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck of Lucky Dragons to document the audible life of Downtown Los Angeles, and Aino Tytti to capture the uncageable energy of Shoreditch. Lucky Dragons create some of the most interesting sound experiences out there – engaging their physical surroundings, their audience and handmade electronic thingamajigs to create aural snapshots of time and place. Aino Tytti deconstructs and stitches back together the unique harmonies of the shared communal life of sidewalks and cities. In your hands, you hold the fruits of their labors. We also asked artists in every city where we hang our hat to create soundscapes that embody the spirit of each place (or a moment in the space-time continuum). You can read about these noise elves below.

So for now, take a listen. And then if you can, share what you hear when you walk out the door. Send us the early morning sounds of your walk to the train station or the bus stop, or your bike, or to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. Capture the high or the ebb tides of a city alive when you open your windows or walk down an out-of-way lane or stairway into the deep. Also, no one here will protest if you just send a 9 minute recording of your cat purring. We’ll put it all together at our little branch of the Sound Library and share alike.

Using the SoundCloud app on your phone, or any other app for that matter, record audio and then share it on any hashtag-friendly social platform using #acebroadcast and be sure to tag us as well: @acehotel on Twitter and Ace Hotel on Facebook. We’re listening, and it’s never too late to share. We’ll pick a few favorites and be in touch.


LUCKY DRAGONS : DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES


Lucky Dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active as a band since 2000, they are known for their participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools.

Fischbeck and Rara have presented collaborative work in a wide variety of contexts, including the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), the Centre Georges Pompidou, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, London’s Institute for Contemporary Art, The Kitchen in New York, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, MOCA Los Angeles, the 54th Venice Biennale, and the Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, among others. The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a fishing vessel that was caught in the fallout from h-bomb tests in the mid-1950′s, an incident which sparked international outcry and gave birth to the worldwide anti-nuclear movement.

luckydragons.org
acehotel.com/losangeles


AINO TYTTI : SHOREDITCH

Drawing from a palette of processed field recordings, home made synthesizers and distant vocals, Aino Tytti creates shimmering, ethereal drones; fusing interlocking spirals of static and warm distortion into widescreen harmonic backdrops and intricately layered micro structures.

Abandoning conventional tuning scales, sounds are recorded and deconstructed to reveal hidden accents and textures. The results are then layered and expanded using uniquely defined harmonic ratios, realised through custom made synthesizers and digital processing. Part decaying and arresting, part hypnotic yet cerebral, influences from experimentalists such as Popul Vuh, Arvo Part and Throbbing Gristle are smeared alongside contemporary futurists such as Alva Noto and William Basinski.

ainotytti.com
acehotel.com/london


FARMER DAVE : PALM SPRINGS

Farmer Dave Scher is an artist from Southern California whose work encompasses music, sound design, DJing and visual art. In addition to his involvement with Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio and his self-titled work, Scher has worked as a producer and touring/session musician with Animal Collective, Elvis Costello, Interpol, Jenny Lewis, Johnathan Rice, Kurt Vile, Will Oldham, Vetiver and many others. 

A multi-instrumentalist, Scher is known for his textural steel guitar playing and creative use of waveform editing, deriving themes and inspiration from forms and patterns existing in Nature.  He has a particular love for the ocean and its creatures, and often emulates the sound and feel of the Sea with his music. In 2010, Scher launched his multipurpose sound design and composing enterprise Scher Sound, which offers a wide variety of audio-related creative services.

Scher is also the man behind Farmer Dave’s Hot Nuts, a habanero-roasted almond snack based on a family recipe. Mr. Scher lives and works in Venice, CA.

farmerdavescher.com
acehotel.com/palmsprings

DIAMOND TERRIFIER : NOMAD DISTRICT, NYC

Diamond Terrifier is musician, DJ, artist, curator Sam Hillmer. Diamond Terrifier is Sam’s saxophone and electronics solo incarnation which sits at the intersection of ambient drone, world bass and sound system music, and the many great non-western saxophone traditions.

Sam Hillmer is the mind behind seminal Brooklyn noise band/chamber ensemble ZS, the You Are Here Festival (aka The Maze) which he conceives and produces with his visual art duo Trouble, and Representing NYC, the youth hip hop moniker that has released records for The Fly Girlz and Nine 11 Thesaurus on True Panther Sounds and The Social Registry respectively.

diamondterrifier.com
acehotel.com/newyork

WORLD GANG : PDX + SEA

World Gang is a sound collaborative showcasing the work of Jeremiah Green and Darrin Wiener, two of the most enduring threads in the fabric of the Pacific Northwest’s music scene. Producer Darrin Wiener’s amalgam of synths and field recordings have shaped the sound of the Northwest’s IDM community since the turn of the century — the wizard behind the elegant curtains of Plastiq Phantom, DJs On Strike!, and the imputor? label, Wiener’s textural, humane approach to synthetic sounds has left an indelible stamp on the region’s overcast expanse. And the syncopated pulse of collaborator Jeremiah Green, best known as the unfaltering beat behind Modest Mouse, has been upsetting Cascadia’s rhythm for over 20 years. 

With an enviable résumé in film music, sound installation, and commercial work, World Gang has applied their nimble synthesis of organic sound and roiling electronics to a wide range of collaborative projects since 2006. 

music.world-gang.com
acehotel.com/portland
acehotel.com/seattle

INGMAR HERRERA : PANAMA

Panamanian sound artist Ingmar Herrera presents an evocative street collage from busy avenues of Casco Viejo, near our latest portfolio project, American Trade Hotel.

acehotel.com/panama


Portland, OR
The supplementary materials for Golden Retriever's Seer boast verbiage about otoacoustic emissions, inner-ear rectification and 11-limit just intonation — scholarly stuff that betrays the Portland duo’s conservatory-spawned approach to musical experimentation.
But for all of the syllables, it’s language that neglects the simple sonic beauty of the work they make: a submersive, electro-acoustic swell of analog synthesizer and manipulated bass clarinet, all recalling the classic explorations of American experimentalists like Raymond Scott and David Behrman. 
The record’s been out for a minute, but tonight they’ll be celebrating its release at Holocene. Have a listen to their elegant “Flight Song” here.

Portland, OR

The supplementary materials for Golden Retriever's Seer boast verbiage about otoacoustic emissions, inner-ear rectification and 11-limit just intonation — scholarly stuff that betrays the Portland duo’s conservatory-spawned approach to musical experimentation.

But for all of the syllables, it’s language that neglects the simple sonic beauty of the work they make: a submersive, electro-acoustic swell of analog synthesizer and manipulated bass clarinet, all recalling the classic explorations of American experimentalists like Raymond Scott and David Behrman. 

The record’s been out for a minute, but tonight they’ll be celebrating its release at Holocene. Have a listen to their elegant “Flight Song” here.


Portland, OR 

Tomorrow afternoon Oregon Symphony’s Artist in Residence and cellist par excellence Alban Gerhardt will perform solo at Ace Portland. Planted atop our cozy lobby’s coffee table, he’ll send the sound of Bach’s solo suites waving through the hotel for all ears to hear. Come as you are; free as air. 


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