Mad Science transports artists to the year 2045 to conquer planetary and social issues as scientists. On July 12 at 7pm, the Mad Science laboratory hangs a shingle at Gallery 135 in Portland. If you’re in town, stop by to witness the verdant intersection of art and science and a bunch of people having fun. Featured creatives include friends from Wieden, Nike, iDL and a ton of freestylers, plus music by Jaeho and Gemo Wong. Proceeds from the show will benefit CHAP, a nonprofit organization supporting children in crisis through healing arts programs in Oregon.

Mad Science transports artists to the year 2045 to conquer planetary and social issues as scientists. On July 12 at 7pm, the Mad Science laboratory hangs a shingle at Gallery 135 in Portland. If you’re in town, stop by to witness the verdant intersection of art and science and a bunch of people having fun. Featured creatives include friends from Wieden, Nike, iDL and a ton of freestylers, plus music by Jaeho and Gemo Wong. Proceeds from the show will benefit CHAP, a nonprofit organization supporting children in crisis through healing arts programs in Oregon.


Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi was a dreamer, a renegade and a sort of self-ordained formalist, following the idiosyncratic logic of the physical poetry to which he devoted his life and mind. Born in Los Angeles to a poet and an editor, his inspiration came from the spaces between meaning — using his formidable talent and his willingness to risk, he created a new bone structure for the physical and emotional atmospheres in which we live. Pictured here, the artist as a young man (and a crush-worthy one at that), and his sketches, Worksheets for Sculpture, 1945. Noguchi’s We are the Landscape of All We Know has migrated west temporarily from the Noguchi Museum in Long Island to the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon, on view through July 21.

Isamu Noguchi Ace Hotel Japanese Garden Portland


Roadside existentialism by Hope Reynolds of Folk Studios.

Roadside existentialism by Hope Reynolds of Folk Studios.


A genderless society, political intrigue and a journey across 800 miles of ice… Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness was (and is) a groundbreaking, gender-bending 1969 novel that tracks Genly Ai on a trek across the cold, isolated planet of Gethen — a place where human beings are neither female nor male, and society is (in theory) not defined by gender. This weekend is your last chance to see the world premiere of a stage adaptation by Portland Playhouse and Hand2Mouth, with director Jonathan Walters and playwright John Schmor — get tickets at Portland Playhouse.
Portland Playhouse hangs its shingle at a petite, converted chapel in Northeast Portland. Their mission is to continually reinvent the means by which plays are heard and spoken.  We’ll keep you updated on Season Six which includes Detroit by Lisa D’Amour, The Other Place by Sharr White and Jitney by August Wilson among others.
You can also catch our interview with Ursula K. Le Guin from October, 2011.

A genderless society, political intrigue and a journey across 800 miles of ice… Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness was (and is) a groundbreaking, gender-bending 1969 novel that tracks Genly Ai on a trek across the cold, isolated planet of Gethen — a place where human beings are neither female nor male, and society is (in theory) not defined by gender. This weekend is your last chance to see the world premiere of a stage adaptation by Portland Playhouse and Hand2Mouth, with director Jonathan Walters and playwright John Schmor — get tickets at Portland Playhouse.

Portland Playhouse hangs its shingle at a petite, converted chapel in Northeast Portland. Their mission is to continually reinvent the means by which plays are heard and spoken.  We’ll keep you updated on Season Six which includes Detroit by Lisa D’Amour, The Other Place by Sharr White and Jitney by August Wilson among others.

You can also catch our interview with Ursula K. Le Guin from October, 2011.


HOW DO YOU MEAN? CULTURE IN TRANSLATIONPICA SYMPOSIUM, JUNE 7 - 9, PORTLAND, ORE.

We experience the world through continual acts of translation. To be sure, we often carry meaning between languages, but that process isn’t limited to the spoken dialects of different cultures. We turn thoughts into actions, and experiences into conversation. Translation is difference made visible. Translation is experimental. Translation is generous.
Artistic practice is a necessary process of translation, from intangible ideas to concrete forms and decisive gestures, but also between disciplines and bodies, between the artists and their audiences. What possibilities exist in the spaces between kinesthetic and verbal language, visual art and dance, traditional and contemporary expression, local and global styles?
The PICA Symposium is an interdisciplinary weekend of art, performance, and conversations, investigating the complexity of constructing and communicating culture in contemporary art. It’s an update of a classical model for our hyphenated culture, weighing experience and activity equally with lectures and panels. It is driven by your involvement, it’s propelled by your movement.

See featured events, more information and a schedule here.

HOW DO YOU MEAN? CULTURE IN TRANSLATION
PICA SYMPOSIUM, JUNE 7 - 9, PORTLAND, ORE.

We experience the world through continual acts of translation. To be sure, we often carry meaning between languages, but that process isn’t limited to the spoken dialects of different cultures. We turn thoughts into actions, and experiences into conversation. Translation is difference made visible. Translation is experimental. Translation is generous.

Artistic practice is a necessary process of translation, from intangible ideas to concrete forms and decisive gestures, but also between disciplines and bodies, between the artists and their audiences. What possibilities exist in the spaces between kinesthetic and verbal language, visual art and dance, traditional and contemporary expression, local and global styles?

The PICA Symposium is an interdisciplinary weekend of art, performance, and conversations, investigating the complexity of constructing and communicating culture in contemporary art. It’s an update of a classical model for our hyphenated culture, weighing experience and activity equally with lectures and panels. It is driven by your involvement, it’s propelled by your movement.

See featured events, more information and a schedule here.



Meet the people who wash your dishes.
The Dishwasher Project is an intimate portrayal and tribute to the men and women behind Portland’s celebrated culinary scene. The paintings seek to honor the individual, their lives in the back of the house, and humanize the grueling work of keeping the restaurant service moving. Our hope for this project is to plant a question in the minds of patrons of these restaurants with rock-star-status chefs who, truly, are only as good as their team. We took the most unsavory of these positions, the individuals who see the aftermath of a meal and live in the steam, soap and waste of an otherwise glorious experience. We hope to give a face and history to the hands that hold our dishes. We are humbled to have their stories to share, and hope that the next time you spend a Sunday afternoon indulging in a five-star brunch, you’ll consider the people for which there is no James Beard Award, but should garner your esteem.

Natalie Sept began this project in 2010 during her time at Papa Haydn restaurant where she was a pastry tech, and began to take notice of the dishwashers who often times where coming from another job and leaving to the next after their time washing dishes. Israel Bayer joined Natalie in 2012 and began taking photographs for the project. You can view it tonight for a one-night-only show in The Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland.
Pictured here in order are Efrain, Katrine, Maestro and George.

Meet the people who wash your dishes.

The Dishwasher Project is an intimate portrayal and tribute to the men and women behind Portland’s celebrated culinary scene. The paintings seek to honor the individual, their lives in the back of the house, and humanize the grueling work of keeping the restaurant service moving. Our hope for this project is to plant a question in the minds of patrons of these restaurants with rock-star-status chefs who, truly, are only as good as their team. We took the most unsavory of these positions, the individuals who see the aftermath of a meal and live in the steam, soap and waste of an otherwise glorious experience. We hope to give a face and history to the hands that hold our dishes. We are humbled to have their stories to share, and hope that the next time you spend a Sunday afternoon indulging in a five-star brunch, you’ll consider the people for which there is no James Beard Award, but should garner your esteem.

Natalie Sept began this project in 2010 during her time at Papa Haydn restaurant where she was a pastry tech, and began to take notice of the dishwashers who often times where coming from another job and leaving to the next after their time washing dishes. Israel Bayer joined Natalie in 2012 and began taking photographs for the project. You can view it tonight for a one-night-only show in The Cleaners at Ace Hotel Portland.

Pictured here in order are Efrain, Katrine, Maestro and George.


Chris Johanson's Quiet Music Festival begins tonight at Disjecta in Portland. “With so much blown yang energy,” Chris says, “people need to get into their yin energy and power, and we’re excited about the possibility of people falling asleep during the performances this year. Our mission is to find more rugs and pillows for the upcoming festival, so they’ll be even more objects to fall asleep on.” He adds, “Expect to have good dreams.”
Soothecore ear-kissers include Sun Foot, Dragging An Ox Through Water, Heidi Alexander, cellist Lori Goldston, Meg Baird, Michael Henrickson, Money Mark, Sun Foot, Peggy Honeywell, White Magic, Volunteers Park and a multi-piece act by Tara Jane O’Neil that fuses stone age technology with electronic devices.
Plummet into slumber with us tonight and tomorrow — you can get tickets at the door for one or both nights.

Chris Johanson's Quiet Music Festival begins tonight at Disjecta in Portland. “With so much blown yang energy,” Chris says, “people need to get into their yin energy and power, and we’re excited about the possibility of people falling asleep during the performances this year. Our mission is to find more rugs and pillows for the upcoming festival, so they’ll be even more objects to fall asleep on.” He adds, “Expect to have good dreams.”

Soothecore ear-kissers include Sun Foot, Dragging An Ox Through Water, Heidi Alexander, cellist Lori Goldston, Meg Baird, Michael Henrickson, Money Mark, Sun Foot, Peggy Honeywell, White Magic, Volunteers Park and a multi-piece act by Tara Jane O’Neil that fuses stone age technology with electronic devices.

Plummet into slumber with us tonight and tomorrow — you can get tickets at the door for one or both nights.


Vanport was a city of public housing — hastily planned and built — in Multnomah County, Oregon. The second largest town at the time in Oregon, and the largest public housing project in the nation, it was constructed in ‘43 to house workers of the Kaiser Shipyards during wartime, and was home to over 40,000 people, almost half African American. After the war ended, more than half of Vanport’s residents moved on, but many remained and an influx of WWII vets helped the makeshift city hang on.
Dramatically, and without warning, Vanport was roundly destroyed by flood this day 65 years ago when a section of the dike retaining the Columbia River collapsed during a flood. Fifteen people were killed and the city itself was completely underwater by nightfall, leaving all of its inhabitants homeless.
Oregon has a gnarly history of racist housing discrimination, and that legacy lives on today in so many subtle and not-so-subtle ways. At the time that Vanport existed, its cultural, racial and linguistic diversity rivaled that of present-day New York City. It was an anomaly, a firecracker, a happy accident, a big mistake, a setup for disaster, and, predictably, not well-protected by its government. The lack of care and attention paid by the county when Vanport flooded mimics the much-derided bumbles of our federal government when Katrina hit New Orleans.
The city, now vanished, has an incredible and rare history — read up on it today when you have some time, and let us know what you think, or if you were there and you have a story, send it along. For more in-depth reading, swoop up a box set of Oregon History comics by Know Your City (formerly the Dill Pickle Club) — Portland’s Black Panthers, Oregon feminism and the history of Chinatown are yours for the learning.

Vanport was a city of public housing — hastily planned and built — in Multnomah County, Oregon. The second largest town at the time in Oregon, and the largest public housing project in the nation, it was constructed in ‘43 to house workers of the Kaiser Shipyards during wartime, and was home to over 40,000 people, almost half African American. After the war ended, more than half of Vanport’s residents moved on, but many remained and an influx of WWII vets helped the makeshift city hang on.

Dramatically, and without warning, Vanport was roundly destroyed by flood this day 65 years ago when a section of the dike retaining the Columbia River collapsed during a flood. Fifteen people were killed and the city itself was completely underwater by nightfall, leaving all of its inhabitants homeless.

Oregon has a gnarly history of racist housing discrimination, and that legacy lives on today in so many subtle and not-so-subtle ways. At the time that Vanport existed, its cultural, racial and linguistic diversity rivaled that of present-day New York City. It was an anomaly, a firecracker, a happy accident, a big mistake, a setup for disaster, and, predictably, not well-protected by its government. The lack of care and attention paid by the county when Vanport flooded mimics the much-derided bumbles of our federal government when Katrina hit New Orleans.

The city, now vanished, has an incredible and rare history — read up on it today when you have some time, and let us know what you think, or if you were there and you have a story, send it along. For more in-depth reading, swoop up a box set of Oregon History comics by Know Your City (formerly the Dill Pickle Club) — Portland’s Black Panthers, Oregon feminism and the history of Chinatown are yours for the learning.


The Self Evident Truths Project aka iO Tillett Wright visited Portland yesterday in the quest to photograph absolutely anyone and everyone who falls on the LGBTQ spectrum in any way. Here’s one now, beaming away. Follow them around the country and see if they’re stopping in your town soon.

The Self Evident Truths Project aka iO Tillett Wright visited Portland yesterday in the quest to photograph absolutely anyone and everyone who falls on the LGBTQ spectrum in any way. Here’s one now, beaming away. Follow them around the country and see if they’re stopping in your town soon.


Lowell is our new favorite spot in Portland. Buy a trinket for your altar and cloak your shoulders in a storied, kinesthetically-fulfilling textile from far yonder. Maya and Dino are the purveyors, curators and charmers at Lowell — stop in and see them some time.







Photographs by Laura Dart

Lowell is our new favorite spot in Portland. Buy a trinket for your altar and cloak your shoulders in a storied, kinesthetically-fulfilling textile from far yonder. Maya and Dino are the purveyors, curators and charmers at Lowell — stop in and see them some time.

Photographs by Laura Dart


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