London Shoreditch, United Kingdom

Photo and collage by multi-talent Anthony Gerace.

Anthony created large-scale collages for Ace London’s guest rooms this fall. Currently he’s finishing his collage series There Must Be More to Life Than This and embarking on new photo projects we can’t wait to see, including a survey of classic cinemas in London and a look at Box Elder County Utah.


French photographer Alain Laboile presents "La Famille," his first U.S. exhibition through January 4 at the dnj gallery in Santa Monica.

French photographer Alain Laboile presents "La Famille," his first U.S. exhibition through January 4 at the dnj gallery in Santa Monica.


Icelandic color and pattern inspiration from Reveiller.

Icelandic color and pattern inspiration from Reveiller.


Sleep of Beloved by photographer Paul Schneggenburger. We’re slow dancing in our sleep.

Sleep of Beloved by photographer Paul Schneggenburger. We’re slow dancing in our sleep.






Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.
"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."
Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Ace Hotel New York Art Book Fair 2013 Photo-Eye Shuji Terayama

Santa Fe rare book shop Photo-Eye is among dozens of jewels gathering at this weekend’s Art Book Fair at PS1 in Queens. Their books light a flame of book greed in our hearts so strong it hurts. This specimen from their shelves, Shuji Terayama’s Photothèque imaginaire, was designed and handbound in Tokyo, 1975, and belly-bound in an original printed obi.

"Playwright, poet, photographer, filmmaker and all-around provacateur Shuji Terayama is one of the most important figures in the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties and seventies. He produced over 200 literary works and over 20 shorts and full-length films as well as untold works of theater with Tenjo Sajiki and others. Like his films, the photomontages in Photothèque imaginaire… are self-consciously experimental, often surreal, and frequently confounding. And, like the Parisian Surrealists of the 1920s and 30s, he was a great fan of Lautréamont’s Les Chants de Maldoror. He vehemently opposed the protection of the status quo and attacked the righteousness of the Japanese family system and any vestiges of nationalism."

Suzanne Feld, Between Two Worlds: Selected Postwar Japanese Films, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art


Food stylist and photographer Gabriel Cabrera of The Artful Desperado, whom we discovered on Austin’s Reveiller, makes us very hungry and happy.

Food stylist and photographer Gabriel Cabrera of The Artful Desperado, whom we discovered on Austin’s Reveiller, makes us very hungry and happy.

Ace Hotel The Artful Desperado

Ace Hotel The Artful Desperado

Ace Hotel The Artful Desperado

Ace Hotel The Artful Desperado


Astrid Kircherr was out with some friends in her native Hamburg one night in 1960 when they stepped into the Kaiserkeller and came face to face with rock n’ roll personified. In the next four years Kircherr documented the transformation of the original line-up of the Beatles from five to the Fab Four, from cherub-faced rockabilly youth to the centerpiece of probably the most viral explosion of global youth culture ever seen. The pictures she took in those days — before the Beatles were the Beatles — might as well be from a different world. In a way they are from a different world, though one whose orbit paralleled ours before “She Loves You” awakened some dormant spirit in the teenage mass and a new course put some drift between us. The Early Beatles Collection, including rarely seen photos taken by Kircherr between 1960-1964, opened today at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles and is up for a bit, stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.

Astrid Kircherr was out with some friends in her native Hamburg one night in 1960 when they stepped into the Kaiserkeller and came face to face with rock n’ roll personified. In the next four years Kircherr documented the transformation of the original line-up of the Beatles from five to the Fab Four, from cherub-faced rockabilly youth to the centerpiece of probably the most viral explosion of global youth culture ever seen. The pictures she took in those days — before the Beatles were the Beatles — might as well be from a different world. In a way they are from a different world, though one whose orbit paralleled ours before “She Loves You” awakened some dormant spirit in the teenage mass and a new course put some drift between us. The Early Beatles Collection, including rarely seen photos taken by Kircherr between 1960-1964, opened today at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles and is up for a bit, stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.




Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.

Brooklyn photographer Brian Vu made these photos. His brother Chris helped with the last one.


In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer invented the wet-plate collodion photographic process, more commonly known as the tintype. Because tintypes were safer and more affordable than the earlier Daguerreotypes, for the first time, people could own portraits of themselves and their loved ones. Many people once believed that photographs were a way of stealing one’s soul. From the eerily beautiful way tintypes reflect the eyes, skin and shadow, it would appear they at least pull it acutely to the surface.
You can get your own tintype portrait taken by Michael Schindler, owner of the tintype-specialized photographic studio Photobooth in San Francisco, on July 28 at The Aviary in Seattle, with which you can spook, woo and wow yourself and others. Michael works accordingly to the techniques that Frederick Scott Archer developed 150 years ago: each tintype photograph is crafted directly onto a chemically-treated metal plate placed in the camera. The process is very meticulous, and the talent of the photographer lies in his ability to master the chemistry and the lighting, as well as a careful timing. For his session at The Aviary, Michael will bring along the 14”x17” camera that he just completed in order to create the largest format metal plate images he has ever produced.
In a time where we take so many photographs every day that we rarely even print them out, this format movingly encourages us to slow down, show up and remember.
To arrange a portrait sitting, send an email or call 206.641.4481.

In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer invented the wet-plate collodion photographic process, more commonly known as the tintype. Because tintypes were safer and more affordable than the earlier Daguerreotypes, for the first time, people could own portraits of themselves and their loved ones. Many people once believed that photographs were a way of stealing one’s soul. From the eerily beautiful way tintypes reflect the eyes, skin and shadow, it would appear they at least pull it acutely to the surface.

You can get your own tintype portrait taken by Michael Schindler, owner of the tintype-specialized photographic studio Photobooth in San Francisco, on July 28 at The Aviary in Seattle, with which you can spook, woo and wow yourself and others. Michael works accordingly to the techniques that Frederick Scott Archer developed 150 years ago: each tintype photograph is crafted directly onto a chemically-treated metal plate placed in the camera. The process is very meticulous, and the talent of the photographer lies in his ability to master the chemistry and the lighting, as well as a careful timing. For his session at The Aviary, Michael will bring along the 14”x17” camera that he just completed in order to create the largest format metal plate images he has ever produced.

In a time where we take so many photographs every day that we rarely even print them out, this format movingly encourages us to slow down, show up and remember.

To arrange a portrait sitting, send an email or call 206.641.4481.

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Practically unknown, the work of Panamanian photographic pioneer Carlos Endara Andrade leaves a portrait of a felicitous Panama. With almost messianic determination, he photographed what he saw as a fortunate (even lucky) society, precisely because the engine of its socioeconomic machine was a hulk of contradictions in a constant state of flux. What distinguishes Endara from the photographers of his time is the range of his human and environmental register. With a frontal, direct and eloquent style, he photographed the poor, immigrants, families and couples without confining himself by any means to the wealthy; rather, he photographed people of diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, thus capturing the diversity of humanity that arrived in Panama in search of a better life. Here, he finds pupils at San José School performing the Court of Civilization Allegory in 1905.

From PhotoEspaña

Practically unknown, the work of Panamanian photographic pioneer Carlos Endara Andrade leaves a portrait of a felicitous Panama. With almost messianic determination, he photographed what he saw as a fortunate (even lucky) society, precisely because the engine of its socioeconomic machine was a hulk of contradictions in a constant state of flux. What distinguishes Endara from the photographers of his time is the range of his human and environmental register. With a frontal, direct and eloquent style, he photographed the poor, immigrants, families and couples without confining himself by any means to the wealthy; rather, he photographed people of diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, thus capturing the diversity of humanity that arrived in Panama in search of a better life. Here, he finds pupils at San José School performing the Court of Civilization Allegory in 1905.


From PhotoEspaña


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