Paris 
Post-parade, maybe. But never post-Pride. 

photo by Loren Daye

Paris 

Post-parade, maybe. But never post-Pride. 

photo by Loren Daye


London
JD Samson making things spin at Everyone in London over the weekend. Next stop Palm Springs Pride at our loco little swimmin’ and sleepin’ spot. 

London

JD Samson making things spin at Everyone in London over the weekend. Next stop Palm Springs Pride at our loco little swimmin’ and sleepin’ spot


San Francisco, London and everywhere.  
After some years of gay-ins early in ’70s Golden Gate Park, on this day in 1978, San Francisco Pride pushed through Market as Gay Freedom Day. That day was the coming out of the Gilbert Baker-designed Rainbow Flag that has become a banner for the rights of everyone. 
Tomorrow in Shoreditch at Ace Hotel we’re rainbow flagging it up with JD Samson and our collaborative Pride party Everyone. Everyone’s invited. We’ve got a Pride playlist to blast on the ‘phones as you get ready for tonight. It’s the second part of our series of Pride celebrations with JD at Ace outposts in LA, London, New York, and Palm Springs. (And number three Pride is this weekend in New York City.)
You can dance, you can sing, you can make a team of hi-fivers and hi-five everyone you see if you want. You can be free and be together with free people. As part of the party, JD created a hand-screened shirt and a poster that you can pick up to pack pride anywhere you wear clothes or have walls. And proceeds go to help good people, too. 

San Francisco, London and everywhere.  

After some years of gay-ins early in ’70s Golden Gate Park, on this day in 1978, San Francisco Pride pushed through Market as Gay Freedom Day. That day was the coming out of the Gilbert Baker-designed Rainbow Flag that has become a banner for the rights of everyone. 

Tomorrow in Shoreditch at Ace Hotel we’re rainbow flagging it up with JD Samson and our collaborative Pride party Everyone. Everyone’s invited. We’ve got a Pride playlist to blast on the ‘phones as you get ready for tonight. It’s the second part of our series of Pride celebrations with JD at Ace outposts in LA, London, New York, and Palm Springs. (And number three Pride is this weekend in New York City.)

You can dance, you can sing, you can make a team of hi-fivers and hi-five everyone you see if you want. You can be free and be together with free people. As part of the party, JD created a hand-screened shirt and a poster that you can pick up to pack pride anywhere you wear clothes or have walls. And proceeds go to help good people, too. 


Downtown Los Angeles 
In opposition to Anita Bryant’s “Save Our Children” campaign — the first major organized opposition to the gay rights movement. 
This weekend at Ace DTLA we’re taking a more positive bend. It’s the first in a series of Pride parties along with JD Samson to celebrate everyone just as they want to be. While we won’t be throwing pies, we definitely will be making our own pie in the sky right here on earth. 
Photo by William Gedney

Downtown Los Angeles 

In opposition to Anita Bryant’s “Save Our Children” campaign — the first major organized opposition to the gay rights movement. 

This weekend at Ace DTLA we’re taking a more positive bend. It’s the first in a series of Pride parties along with JD Samson to celebrate everyone just as they want to be. While we won’t be throwing pies, we definitely will be making our own pie in the sky right here on earth. 

Photo by William Gedney


Downtown Los Angeles
Are you a person, dear reader? Well well. Good news. Along with JD Samson, we’re throwing a Pride party for people. It’s the first leg of our four-stop tour to bring everyone we can together to dance and smile and love and sweat. If you can’t wait till this weekend, JD made a mix called — and for — All of Us. It just keeps getting better. See you on the dance floor. 

Downtown Los Angeles

Are you a person, dear reader? Well well. Good news. Along with JD Samson, we’re throwing a Pride party for people. It’s the first leg of our four-stop tour to bring everyone we can together to dance and smile and love and sweat. If you can’t wait till this weekend, JD made a mix called — and for — All of Us. It just keeps getting better. See you on the dance floor. 


Nazaret, Ethiopia 

It’s sometimes easy to get stuck when thinking about how to help people in far-away places when it comes to money. This JD Samson piece has been bouncing around in our heads lately as we’ve been Pride-prepping with her playlist on the ‘phones. 

Apolis, our teammate for this scarf we’ve got going, has one really great process idea: find a way to use money to be a better global citizen. They go out and help to empower communities that are struggling by bringing them jobs and infrastructure. The scarfs in this video, above, were hand-loomed in Nazaret, Ethopia, helping to provide sustainable employment and a fair wage for a growing artisan cooperative of women freed from prostitution in the region. The people you see in the video are businesspeople, competing in a global market and providing something beautiful, well-made, unique. If you’re careful and attentive, you can build good with the dollars you spend.


Los Angeles / London / New York / Palm Springs
Pride is coming. And everyone is invited. This year we’re tickled all colors of the rainbow that JD Samson is teaming with us to pop the pride parties for our locals in LA / LDN / NYC / PSP. JD’s been a pardner to Ace here for a hot minute, and it’s with worlds of pleasure that we work together again. The cherry on top: JD went out and made a special mixtape for our aural delight. Participate. Be active. Let’s be out and let’s do this. #everyonespride

Los Angeles / London / New York / Palm Springs

Pride is coming. And everyone is invited. This year we’re tickled all colors of the rainbow that JD Samson is teaming with us to pop the pride parties for our locals in LA / LDN / NYC / PSP. JD’s been a pardner to Ace here for a hot minute, and it’s with worlds of pleasure that we work together again. The cherry on top: JD went out and made a special mixtape for our aural delight. Participate. Be active. Let’s be out and let’s do this. #everyonespride


Mugshot Monday brings us this Federal Bureau of Prisons mugshot of Bayard Rustin, circa 1944. Recently awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama, Rustin is one of our political, sartorial and intellectual icons of the twentieth century. He served as a leading force in the civil rights movement, consulted MLK on Gandhian tactics he learned in India and organized the March on Washington as a relatively young gay man. His activism extended into the remainder of his life as a civil rights hero and staunch advocate for lesbian and gay rights. His was a mission of integration, compassion and fierce self-love, and he never cowed to pressures from within the civil rights movement to hide or downplay his sexuality. “Physically, sexually he was the most compelling man I have ever seen,” Gay Morenus recalled of Rustin, whom she met in Chapel Hill, North Carolina three years after this mugshot was taken. With colleagues from the Fellowship of Reconciliation, he was there on a mission: use non-violent direct action to challenge state segregation laws on interstate public transportation; in this case, buses. For this pre-echo of the 1961 Freedom Rides, Rustin would eventually spend twenty-two days on a North Carolina chain gang. Rustin was no stranger to punishment: for refusing both the draft and alternative, non-combat service, the West Chester, Pennsylvania-raised Quaker had spent twenty-eight months (February 1944 – June 1946) in federal prison. Though he’d be arrested for civil disobedience many more times, one incident stands out. From the Chicago Defender, January 31, 1953:
Bayard Rustin, 40, prominent lecturer and fearless fighter for civil rights, was sentenced to 60 days in county jail on a morals charge on a guilty plea… He was arrested by Pasadena police last Thursday in company with two white men in an auto parked near a hotel. The other men… were given similar sentences…sexual deviates often referred to as “queers.”
Rustin believed that acceptance, diversity and mutual respect were the underpinnings of all strata of a civil society, regardless of the purported focus of any given movement. He understood love as the foundation for progress. What does it mean to love — to live — so abundantly? Described by an old female friend as  ”the best lay I ever had,” American political activism could well say the same.

Mugshot Monday brings us this Federal Bureau of Prisons mugshot of Bayard Rustin, circa 1944. Recently awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama, Rustin is one of our political, sartorial and intellectual icons of the twentieth century. He served as a leading force in the civil rights movement, consulted MLK on Gandhian tactics he learned in India and organized the March on Washington as a relatively young gay man. His activism extended into the remainder of his life as a civil rights hero and staunch advocate for lesbian and gay rights. His was a mission of integration, compassion and fierce self-love, and he never cowed to pressures from within the civil rights movement to hide or downplay his sexuality. “Physically, sexually he was the most compelling man I have ever seen,” Gay Morenus recalled of Rustin, whom she met in Chapel Hill, North Carolina three years after this mugshot was taken. With colleagues from the Fellowship of Reconciliation, he was there on a mission: use non-violent direct action to challenge state segregation laws on interstate public transportation; in this case, buses. For this pre-echo of the 1961 Freedom Rides, Rustin would eventually spend twenty-two days on a North Carolina chain gang. Rustin was no stranger to punishment: for refusing both the draft and alternative, non-combat service, the West Chester, Pennsylvania-raised Quaker had spent twenty-eight months (February 1944 – June 1946) in federal prison. Though he’d be arrested for civil disobedience many more times, one incident stands out. From the Chicago Defender, January 31, 1953:

Bayard Rustin, 40, prominent lecturer and fearless fighter for civil rights, was sentenced to 60 days in county jail on a morals charge on a guilty plea… He was arrested by Pasadena police last Thursday in company with two white men in an auto parked near a hotel. The other men… were given similar sentences…sexual deviates often referred to as “queers.”

Rustin believed that acceptance, diversity and mutual respect were the underpinnings of all strata of a civil society, regardless of the purported focus of any given movement. He understood love as the foundation for progress. What does it mean to love — to live — so abundantly? Described by an old female friend as  ”the best lay I ever had,” American political activism could well say the same.


You can’t overestimate how exciting it was to be openly gay in San Francisco in the 1970s. I mean, Stonewall had happened in 1969, gay civil rights legislation was passing in different states, and, you know, for the first time you could love openly and not be considered sick, not be arrested. It was a very exciting, heady time…
Alysia Abbott writes about growing up with her gay dad in SF in the 70s in her new book Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father. As a millenium of civil rights struggles whirs into action before our very eyes — nascent advances are made, fundamental victories are threatened — it’s good to take a close look at those who brought us this far by demanding the right to be themselves.

You can’t overestimate how exciting it was to be openly gay in San Francisco in the 1970s. I mean, Stonewall had happened in 1969, gay civil rights legislation was passing in different states, and, you know, for the first time you could love openly and not be considered sick, not be arrested. It was a very exciting, heady time…

Alysia Abbott writes about growing up with her gay dad in SF in the 70s in her new book Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father. As a millenium of civil rights struggles whirs into action before our very eyes — nascent advances are made, fundamental victories are threatened — it’s good to take a close look at those who brought us this far by demanding the right to be themselves.

Fairyland Memoir

Fairyland Memoir


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