London, UK
Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London. Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith's adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew's trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.


London, UK
Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.

London, UK

Rachel Garrard, Celestial Sphere.


London, UK
Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014. 
We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.
The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  
How and why did you start the blog? 
'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.
Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?
Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 
Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 
The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 
Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.

London, UK

Beloved UK blog What We Wore is currently preparing an exhibition and book, to be published by Prestel in Autumn 2014.

We met with co-founder and editor Nina Manandhar to chat about her hunt for the most captivating images and memories about style, and the social and communitarian aspect of one’s personal aesthetic.

The What We Wore Live Archive is in residence at our Gallery bar until tomorrow evening, where everyone’s invited to share their own images and stories about the perception of fashion past.  

How and why did you start the blog? 

'What We Wore' began as format on ISYS, the arts and culture based project and website, which is an exploration of British youth culture. Looking at image sharing websites like flickr a few years back, I noticed that there was a wealth of images that were for the first time being digitized and shared, and there was so much subtlety and nuance in them and the stories attached. The idea is for the images to allow people to tell their stories, to build a community around the stories.

Has your perception of fashion and style evolved?

Although the book is about style and fashion, the project aims to take you on an insiders tour of British youth culture and explore the notion of identity. Style is a key part of the way people belong, form groups, band and disband in youth movements and moments. 

Are you able to define the essence of British style by documenting its evolution between the 50s and today? If so, what is that essence? 

The essence of youth style is the way people reach out to each other to form connections. Style is the answer to an enduring need to affirm oneself. It is not just a British thing — it is the same for youth the world over, because this period of your life is particularly about defining yourself through what you wear on your body. 

Things are more hybrid and fluid now with style, but people have always flowed through scenes and movements. There is still reinvention, new identities emerging in youth culture, not everything is as off the peg as the cynics would suggest.


London, UK
A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.
How do you see yourself?
I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)
How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.
What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…
What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.
A secret power you would like to have?
              
To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…
All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.


London, UKThat Flower Shop
First sign of spring.

London, UK
That Flower Shop

First sign of spring.


Hattie Fox’s winter arrangements, keeping Shoreditch tangly and wild. 

Hattie Fox’s winter arrangements, keeping Shoreditch tangly and wild. 


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Spending the afternoon exploring ISYS ARCHIVE’s What We Wore project, daydreaming our way onto the memory lanes and into the outfits of our now-neighbors, worn and loved long before there was an Ace Hotel in Shoreditch or anywhere else. 

In 1954, Barbara Ruben and her best friend Pam worked as seamstresses in Spitalfields. They waitressed together for a summer in East Sussex, and bought matching bikinis for the beach. Barbara still lives and works in the neighborhood.


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The simple lace curtain.

The UK’s signature window trimming — in its very existence, highlighting everything we love about this corner of the world — pairs form and function perfectly, obstructing the voyeuristic eyeballs of neighbors while letting in those all-too-precious rays of English sunlight. And because we couldn’t go one more day without our very own signature window trimming, friends at MYB Textiles in Scotland were kind enough to craft a collection of special lace curtains for Bulldog Edition, Ace London’s window-front lobby café.

The only manufacturer in the world still using the Nottingham Lace Looms, MYB has paired their beautifully antiquated machines with CAD software for a fresh design influence. Bulldog Edition’s exclusive lace design was inspired by Grid Index, the comprehensive grid research project of contemporary artist Carsten Nicolai.

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Ace London mural detail.
Collage for Room 135 by Steven Quinn

Ace London mural detail.

Collage for Room 135 by Steven Quinn


Lovage is a medicinal herb that has been used as a digestive aid and culinary flavoring for many generations. The leaf oil has a warm, bright, herbaceous aroma with sweet, celery, woody and spicy undertones. It is often used as a perfume all alone. Different oils are distilled from the roots, leaves, and seeds of the plant.
Lovage has an affinity for the liver, and is used in liver cleansing, to apply directly to the liver with a compress. It has sedative properties and is an emotional relaxant. It helps us claim emotional sovereignty, no longer feeling like we our emotions are dictated by everything and everyone around us.
The aromatic properties of lovage can help to open the heart when one has closed it down, due to being hurt or experiencing emotional abuse. It vibrates with the universal heart chakra. It can help transform old thoughts of “I can not open to your love because it makes me vulnerable to hurt” to “I love you and you do not have to love me back. I know love makes me vulnerable to hurt, and I can handle the hurt if and when it comes.”
Lovage is an expensive oil to distill, as it yields only 1% essential oil. However, it is one of those rare friends that add so much to the quality of our lives, so it is growing in popularity. 
Lovage is now open.

Lovage is a medicinal herb that has been used as a digestive aid and culinary flavoring for many generations. The leaf oil has a warm, bright, herbaceous aroma with sweet, celery, woody and spicy undertones. It is often used as a perfume all alone. Different oils are distilled from the roots, leaves, and seeds of the plant.

Lovage has an affinity for the liver, and is used in liver cleansing, to apply directly to the liver with a compress. It has sedative properties and is an emotional relaxant. It helps us claim emotional sovereignty, no longer feeling like we our emotions are dictated by everything and everyone around us.

The aromatic properties of lovage can help to open the heart when one has closed it down, due to being hurt or experiencing emotional abuse. It vibrates with the universal heart chakra. It can help transform old thoughts of “I can not open to your love because it makes me vulnerable to hurt” to “I love you and you do not have to love me back. I know love makes me vulnerable to hurt, and I can handle the hurt if and when it comes.”

Lovage is an expensive oil to distill, as it yields only 1% essential oil. However, it is one of those rare friends that add so much to the quality of our lives, so it is growing in popularity. 

Lovage is now open.


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