Downtown Los Angeles

Last night in LA, Swedish siren Lykke Li enchanted a sold out audience at The Theatre, and we’re still basking in the glow of her spell. We’ve been waiting months for this moment, and L.L.’s command of the space was awe-inspiring — the elegant bluster of her voice convincingly taking over every corner of the house. Think we might have fallen a little bit more in love with you, Lykke Li. Is it too soon to do it again?

Photos by Makiko Wakita.


Downtown Los Angeles

"Love Me Like I’m Not Made Of Stone," from Lykke Li’s forthcoming I Never Learn.

Tickets for Lykke’s May 19 show at The Theatre at Ace Hotel, sponsored by Martin Guitar, go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am PST.


Right now it’s quiet. The only sound an atmospheric hum of anticipation, the final parts coming together as preparation comes to a close and Spiritualized takes the stage to officially reopen this historic theatre. 
Photo by Spencer Lowell.

Right now it’s quiet. The only sound an atmospheric hum of anticipation, the final parts coming together as preparation comes to a close and Spiritualized takes the stage to officially reopen this historic theatre. 

Photo by Spencer Lowell.


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The Theatre
Downtown Los Angeles, CA

Works by John Baldessari, who joined Meg Cranston and Hans Ulrich Obrist at Ace DTLA this past weekend for Surface Magazine’s Design Dialogues.


On December 26, 1927, in Hollywood’s Golden Age, Downtown Los Angeles welcomes the first United Artists Theatre.
Built upon Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks’s will to free artists from the major movie corporations, the building brought a new aesthetic to the Broadway Theatre District — the ornaments inspired by the Spanish Gothic era marked a break in the Art Deco architecture in vogue at the time.
We couldn’t be happier to be part of the building’s history and we look forward to celebrating its 85th anniversary by reopening its doors to our friends, old and new.
Read the full article published in The Motion Picture News from January-March 1928.
         

On December 26, 1927, in Hollywood’s Golden Age, Downtown Los Angeles welcomes the first United Artists Theatre.

Built upon Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks’s will to free artists from the major movie corporations, the building brought a new aesthetic to the Broadway Theatre District  the ornaments inspired by the Spanish Gothic era marked a break in the Art Deco architecture in vogue at the time.

We couldn’t be happier to be part of the building’s history and we look forward to celebrating its 85th anniversary by reopening its doors to our friends, old and new.

Read the full article published in The Motion Picture News from January-March 1928.

         


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